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ON THIS DAY – October 31, 1928

 

Joseph Livingstone, aged 66 years, formerly an estate agent, was charged at the City Court to-day with having, at Frankston, on October 31, wilfully murdered Margaret Mary Fearon.  S.C. Elliott said he arrested Livingstone at Frankston on the morning of October 31. He asked for a remand until November 14, which was granted.  Margaret Mary Fearon, sister-in-law of Livingstone, was found dead at Frankston on the morning of October 31 with her throat cut. Livingstone was found in bed in the house with an injury to his throat. He appeared in Court to-day with his throat heavily bandaged.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – October 27, 1856

At around 4am on the morning of October 27th, 1856, Sergeant-Major Cahir discovered a woman coming along Bellarine Street from the direction of the Barwon River. He recognised her as Catherine Finnegan, the wife of Sergeant Owen Finnegan. Cahir asked her why she was out so early and she admitted to murdering her two youngest children, 3 week old twins John and Judith. Mrs Finnegan was known for her eccentric behaviour, and so Cahir escorted her back to her Bourke Crescent home, where he found Sergeant Owen Finnegan in distress. Finnegan asked his wife what she had done with the children, which she wouldn’t answer. Cahir and the Finnegan entered the property and soon discovered a bloody razor on the foot of the little bed where the children had lain. Mrs Finnegan was conveyed to the watch house and a more thorough search was made for the children. The foot of Mrs Finnegan’s bed was found to be saturated with blood although the covers had been drawn over the mess. The bodies of the children were found at the bottom of the water closet, when blood stains were discovered at the top. Around 6am Constable Grant went down and retrieved the children’s bodies. Both infants had their throats cut, from their ears to the centre of the throat and John also had a deep cut to one of his hands.  The inquest into the children’s death was conducted at the Portarlington Hotel on the same day, the 27th October 1856. At the conclusion of the inquest, Forster Shaw, the district Coroner, returned a verdict that the children had been “put to death by their mother who was at the time insane”. Catherine Finnegan was committed to trial.

ON THIS DAY – May 11, 1909

RICHMOND

 

The Coroner, Dr. Cole, resumed inquiry regarding the death of Margaret Gallagher, aged 77, who was found on May 11 with her throat cut, and her skull fractured, at her home in Little Buckingham street, Richmond. Arthur O’Sullivan, a butcher, charged with wilful murder of deceased, was present in custody. After lengthy evidence had been heard the coroner found O’Sullivan guilty of wilful murder, and committed him for trial at the Supreme Court sitting on June 15.

ON THIS DAY – May 3, 1910

MELBOURNE

Melanie Dean, whose throat was cut on May 3 by John Tunks, died yesterday in the Melbourne Hospital. Tunks and Mrs Dean had been living together, and in a fit of jealousy or temper he cut her throat at the Sir Walter Scott Hotel, in Elizabeth street, and then committed suicide by cutting his own. The body was removed to the Morgue

ON THIS DAY ………… 14th March 1933

BRUNSWICK

The body of Grace Weston, aged 31, was found in a bedroom of her home on this day in 1933, with her throat cut. John McKenzie Weston, a butcher of Brunswick, was committed for trial by the Coroner, for the murder of his wife. The police alleged that in a signed statement he made to them Weston accused his wife of going out with another man. She promised to have nothing more to do with the man, but on the. 14th of March the man drove his wife home in a car. She told him she was going away with the man. That night he pushed her into the bedroom, locked the door, and cut her throat with a razor. A constable then smashed the door in and took him outside.

THE OTHER “MAN.”

Murray McWilliams, a furrier, of North Melbourne, said he had known Mrs. Weston for about six months, and had seen her two or three times a week. He had taken her for drives in his car, but had done nothing improper. He promised Weston that he would not see her again, but on March 14 he saw her by chance, and offered to take her home, where she had an appointment. Later they had tea at St. Kilda, and drove to Black Rock. Mrs. Weston, did not appear to want to go home. On the way back, when they were nearing Weston’s home. Weston jumped on to the running board. Weston laid his hands on his wife. She screamed for help, and McWilliams struck Weston.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – January 8, 1974

Senior Constable Norman Curson was murdered on this day in 1974. Senior Constable Curson was standing on the steps at the main entrance to Flinders Street Railway Station, Melbourne talking to a newspaper seller. Whilst they spoke a young woman came up and spoke to the Constable, who turned towards her. At that moment, James Henry Belsey, walked up behind him, produced a knife, and cut the policeman’s throat.

 

ON THIS DAY – October 31, 1928

 

Joseph Livingstone, aged 66 years, formerly an estate agent, was charged at the City Court to-day with having, at Frankston, on October 31, wilfully murdered Margaret Mary Fearon.  S.C. Elliott said he arrested Livingstone at Frankston on the morning of October 31. He asked for a remand until November 14, which was granted.  Margaret Mary Fearon, sister-in-law of Livingstone, was found dead at Frankston on the morning of October 31 with her throat cut. Livingstone was found in bed in the house with an injury to his throat. He appeared in Court to-day with his throat heavily bandaged.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – October 27, 1856

At around 4am on the morning of October 27th, 1856, Sergeant-Major Cahir discovered a woman coming along Bellarine Street from the direction of the Barwon River. He recognised her as Catherine Finnegan, the wife of Sergeant Owen Finnegan. Cahir asked her why she was out so early and she admitted to murdering her two youngest children, 3 week old twins John and Judith. Mrs Finnegan was known for her eccentric behaviour, and so Cahir escorted her back to her Bourke Crescent home, where he found Sergeant Owen Finnegan in distress. Finnegan asked his wife what she had done with the children, which she wouldn’t answer. Cahir and the Finnegan entered the property and soon discovered a bloody razor on the foot of the little bed where the children had lain. Mrs Finnegan was conveyed to the watch house and a more thorough search was made for the children. The foot of Mrs Finnegan’s bed was found to be saturated with blood although the covers had been drawn over the mess. The bodies of the children were found at the bottom of the water closet, when blood stains were discovered at the top. Around 6am Constable Grant went down and retrieved the children’s bodies. Both infants had their throats cut, from their ears to the centre of the throat and John also had a deep cut to one of his hands.  The inquest into the children’s death was conducted at the Portarlington Hotel on the same day, the 27th October 1856. At the conclusion of the inquest, Forster Shaw, the district Coroner, returned a verdict that the children had been “put to death by their mother who was at the time insane”. Catherine Finnegan was committed to trial.

ON THIS DAY – May 11, 1909

RICHMOND

 

The Coroner, Dr. Cole, resumed inquiry regarding the death of Margaret Gallagher, aged 77, who was found on May 11 with her throat cut, and her skull fractured, at her home in Little Buckingham street, Richmond. Arthur O’Sullivan, a butcher, charged with wilful murder of deceased, was present in custody. After lengthy evidence had been heard the coroner found O’Sullivan guilty of wilful murder, and committed him for trial at the Supreme Court sitting on June 15.

ON THIS DAY – May 3, 1910

MELBOURNE

Melanie Dean, whose throat was cut on May 3 by John Tunks, died yesterday in the Melbourne Hospital. Tunks and Mrs Dean had been living together, and in a fit of jealousy or temper he cut her throat at the Sir Walter Scott Hotel, in Elizabeth street, and then committed suicide by cutting his own. The body was removed to the Morgue

ON THIS DAY ………… 14th March 1933

BRUNSWICK

The body of Grace Weston, aged 31, was found in a bedroom of her home on this day in 1933, with her throat cut. John McKenzie Weston, a butcher of Brunswick, was committed for trial by the Coroner, for the murder of his wife. The police alleged that in a signed statement he made to them Weston accused his wife of going out with another man. She promised to have nothing more to do with the man, but on the. 14th of March the man drove his wife home in a car. She told him she was going away with the man. That night he pushed her into the bedroom, locked the door, and cut her throat with a razor. A constable then smashed the door in and took him outside.

THE OTHER “MAN.”

Murray McWilliams, a furrier, of North Melbourne, said he had known Mrs. Weston for about six months, and had seen her two or three times a week. He had taken her for drives in his car, but had done nothing improper. He promised Weston that he would not see her again, but on March 14 he saw her by chance, and offered to take her home, where she had an appointment. Later they had tea at St. Kilda, and drove to Black Rock. Mrs. Weston, did not appear to want to go home. On the way back, when they were nearing Weston’s home. Weston jumped on to the running board. Weston laid his hands on his wife. She screamed for help, and McWilliams struck Weston.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – January 8, 1974

Senior Constable Norman Curson was murdered on this day in 1974. Senior Constable Curson was standing on the steps at the main entrance to Flinders Street Railway Station, Melbourne talking to a newspaper seller. Whilst they spoke a young woman came up and spoke to the Constable, who turned towards her. At that moment, James Henry Belsey, walked up behind him, produced a knife, and cut the policeman’s throat.