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On this day …….. 10th of July 1936

The Thylacine was a dasyurid, or carnivorous marsupial, living in Australia up until the twentieth century. It is believed that the Thylacine existed on the Australian mainland until the introduction of the dingo thousands of years ago. Although the Thylacine was often called the Tasmanian Tiger or Tasmanian Wolf, it was neither of these. Its body was similar in shape to that of the placental wolf, but it was a marsupial, putting it in an entirely different class. It stood 58-60cm tall, with a body and tail length of up to 180cm. When Europeans settled in Tasmania, the Thylacine’s fate was sealed. Farmers shot the creatures, fearing them as a threat to livestock, while hunters prized them as trophies; these acts were supported by the government of the time which offered a bounty of one pound for every dead adult Thylacine and ten shillings for each dead Thylacine joey. This bounty system, introduced in 1830, was not terminated until 1909. By this time, the Thylacine was very rare, and being sought for zoos worldwide. Australian authorities were slow to protect native wildlife, with the result that many species became extinct or on the verge of extinction. In a last attempt to protect the remaining specimens, Tasmania named the Thylacine a protected animal. On the 10th of July 1936, the governor of Tasmania, Sir Ernest Clark, announced that “… in exercise of the powers and authority conferred upon me by the Animals and Birds’ Protection Act, 1928, do, by this proclamation, transfer Native Tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus) from Schedule 3, Part 1, to Schedule 2, Part 1, of that Act …”. The last known specimen of the Thylacine died in the Hobart Zoo in September that same year. The last captive animals were exhibited in zoos, where their needs were not understood, and the Thylacines in Hobart died from exposure. Despite numerous apparent “sightings” over the years, not one of these has ever been confirmed, and in 1986, the Thylacine was officially classified as Extinct.

 

Certainly per European history shows Tasmanian Tigers-Zebra Wolfs (Thylacine) roamed large parts of main land Australia. There is plenty of evidence in fossil remains and Aboriginal cave art. But is it possible they still lived in Victoria as little as 100 years ago. Interesting idea when the last known Thylacine died at the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September 1936, and Thylacine’s were declared extinct by international standards in 1986. However there are many accounts of wolf-lions-tiger like animals killing live stock through Gippsland, North East and central Victoria and as far as Tantanoola in South Australia. Below is an account of animal killed by a farmer on the 29th June 1916 at Mirboo North, South Gippsland, Victoria.

The sheep-killing animal that was found poisoned in Mr J. Gilfedder’s paddock, close to the Mirboo North township, Victoria recently, does not appear to be either a dingo or a fox. It was two or three times as large as either of those animals. It had the legs, paws and nails of a dog, and the snout and tail of a fox or a dingo. Its mode of killing sheep was to worry their rumps and pull away some of the entrails. Residents who saw-it say that it was a cross between a dingo or a fox and a dog. To ascertain if possible what the animal was, Mr. Gilfedder intends sending the skull, claws and tail to the Director of the Melbourne Zoo, who is recognised as an authority on animals. Some people at Yinnar who had sheep destroyed in the way described poisoned the carcases; but the animal would not take the bait. A successful way to destroy any other of such breed as turn up among sheep is to skin rabbits and put them in a fire, and thus destroy the smell of the hands, and use one as a trail, and cut others, and lay the baits along the trail, without touching them with the hands. This was the method Mr Gilfedder used. Since the death of the animal we have not heard of any sheep being worried around the district. Mr Gilfedder received the following letter from Mr D. Gibson, of the National Bank, Maffra: – “Dear Sir, – I saw in the paper some few days ago that you had poisoned an animal, somewhat like a dingo, but larger, that had been destroying your sheep. I enclose a rough sketch of the Tasmanian zebra wolf, in the hope that it may enable you to identify it with that animal. I and others have seen them up in the mountains; but the fact of their being indigenous to Victoria has never been established by their capture. Probably they are the animal vaguely called the ‘Tantanoola tiger’ and the ‘Morwell lion,’ which has been seen in so many localities. The zebra wolf is a marsupial, coloured from French-grey to russet brown, according to the season, and striped with dark brown to black on back and tail, and less conspicuously on the legs. The coat is short and close, build very strong, pads especially large for its size, powerful hindquarters, progresses either at a trot or by long bounds, height at shoulder 2ft. 6in. to 3ft. I have seen one in captivity which stood on its hind legs over 5ft. high. They are night prowlers, and carry their young in a pouch. They use hollow logs, etc., to camp in, and cover long distances, rarely coming out in the daylight. This is the reason why they have escaped capture so long. The skin or cleaned skeleton would be eagerly purchased by either Melbourne Zoo (D. Le Soeuf), or the National Gallery Museum. Probably they would fetch £20 or so; so they are worth saving.”

On this day …….. 7th September 1936

The Thylacine, more commonly known as the Tasmanian tiger, was a large carnivorous marsupial. Now believed to be extinct, the thylacine was coloured yellow-brown to grey, with dark stripes across its back from shoulders to tail. Limited to Tasmania in recent times, the discovery of fossils in mainland Australia suggests the thylacine was once widespread across the continent. Thylacines were perceived as a threat to livestock in Tasmania, and the government introduced a bounty in 1888: one pound for each adult scalp and 10 shillings for sub-adults. This, combined with the introduction of dogs, hastened the species’ decline and eventual wipeout. The last-known thylacine died in Hobart Zoo on September 7, 1936; this one was photographed in 1920.

 

On this day …….. 10th of July 1936

The Thylacine was a dasyurid, or carnivorous marsupial, living in Australia up until the twentieth century. It is believed that the Thylacine existed on the Australian mainland until the introduction of the dingo thousands of years ago. Although the Thylacine was often called the Tasmanian Tiger or Tasmanian Wolf, it was neither of these. Its body was similar in shape to that of the placental wolf, but it was a marsupial, putting it in an entirely different class. It stood 58-60cm tall, with a body and tail length of up to 180cm. When Europeans settled in Tasmania, the Thylacine’s fate was sealed. Farmers shot the creatures, fearing them as a threat to livestock, while hunters prized them as trophies; these acts were supported by the government of the time which offered a bounty of one pound for every dead adult Thylacine and ten shillings for each dead Thylacine joey. This bounty system, introduced in 1830, was not terminated until 1909. By this time, the Thylacine was very rare, and being sought for zoos worldwide. Australian authorities were slow to protect native wildlife, with the result that many species became extinct or on the verge of extinction. In a last attempt to protect the remaining specimens, Tasmania named the Thylacine a protected animal. On the 10th of July 1936, the governor of Tasmania, Sir Ernest Clark, announced that “… in exercise of the powers and authority conferred upon me by the Animals and Birds’ Protection Act, 1928, do, by this proclamation, transfer Native Tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus) from Schedule 3, Part 1, to Schedule 2, Part 1, of that Act …”. The last known specimen of the Thylacine died in the Hobart Zoo in September that same year. The last captive animals were exhibited in zoos, where their needs were not understood, and the Thylacines in Hobart died from exposure. Despite numerous apparent “sightings” over the years, not one of these has ever been confirmed, and in 1986, the Thylacine was officially classified as Extinct.

 

Certainly per European history shows Tasmanian Tigers-Zebra Wolfs (Thylacine) roamed large parts of main land Australia. There is plenty of evidence in fossil remains and Aboriginal cave art. But is it possible they still lived in Victoria as little as 100 years ago. Interesting idea when the last known Thylacine died at the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September 1936, and Thylacine’s were declared extinct by international standards in 1986. However there are many accounts of wolf-lions-tiger like animals killing live stock through Gippsland, North East and central Victoria and as far as Tantanoola in South Australia. Below is an account of animal killed by a farmer on the 29th June 1916 at Mirboo North, South Gippsland, Victoria.

The sheep-killing animal that was found poisoned in Mr J. Gilfedder’s paddock, close to the Mirboo North township, Victoria recently, does not appear to be either a dingo or a fox. It was two or three times as large as either of those animals. It had the legs, paws and nails of a dog, and the snout and tail of a fox or a dingo. Its mode of killing sheep was to worry their rumps and pull away some of the entrails. Residents who saw-it say that it was a cross between a dingo or a fox and a dog. To ascertain if possible what the animal was, Mr. Gilfedder intends sending the skull, claws and tail to the Director of the Melbourne Zoo, who is recognised as an authority on animals. Some people at Yinnar who had sheep destroyed in the way described poisoned the carcases; but the animal would not take the bait. A successful way to destroy any other of such breed as turn up among sheep is to skin rabbits and put them in a fire, and thus destroy the smell of the hands, and use one as a trail, and cut others, and lay the baits along the trail, without touching them with the hands. This was the method Mr Gilfedder used. Since the death of the animal we have not heard of any sheep being worried around the district. Mr Gilfedder received the following letter from Mr D. Gibson, of the National Bank, Maffra: – “Dear Sir, – I saw in the paper some few days ago that you had poisoned an animal, somewhat like a dingo, but larger, that had been destroying your sheep. I enclose a rough sketch of the Tasmanian zebra wolf, in the hope that it may enable you to identify it with that animal. I and others have seen them up in the mountains; but the fact of their being indigenous to Victoria has never been established by their capture. Probably they are the animal vaguely called the ‘Tantanoola tiger’ and the ‘Morwell lion,’ which has been seen in so many localities. The zebra wolf is a marsupial, coloured from French-grey to russet brown, according to the season, and striped with dark brown to black on back and tail, and less conspicuously on the legs. The coat is short and close, build very strong, pads especially large for its size, powerful hindquarters, progresses either at a trot or by long bounds, height at shoulder 2ft. 6in. to 3ft. I have seen one in captivity which stood on its hind legs over 5ft. high. They are night prowlers, and carry their young in a pouch. They use hollow logs, etc., to camp in, and cover long distances, rarely coming out in the daylight. This is the reason why they have escaped capture so long. The skin or cleaned skeleton would be eagerly purchased by either Melbourne Zoo (D. Le Soeuf), or the National Gallery Museum. Probably they would fetch £20 or so; so they are worth saving.”

On this day …….. 13th May 1792

The Tasmanian tiger, known also by its palaeontological nickname of Thylacine, was a carnivorous marsupial of Australia. It was once believed to roam the entire Australian mainland, as well as parts of New Guinea. Its disappearance from the mainland is believed to have been due to increased competition for food which resulted from the introduction of the dingo by the Aborigines. The Thylacine was up to 110cm in length, with a strong, stiff tail that was half the length of its body again. At its shoulder, it stood about 60cm tall. The Thylacine had tawny grey-brown fur, and around 16 black or brown stripes on its back, mainly at the tail end. The first evidence of the existence of such a creature came when Abel Tasman discovered Tasmania, which he named Van Diemen’s Land, in 1642. Upon the shores of the island, one of Tasman’s crewman, F. Jacobszoon, described seeing “footprints not ill-resembling the claws of a tiger”. French exploration provided confirmation of the Tasmanian tiger when French naturalist Jacques-Julien Houtou de Labillardière, who was on Rear Admiral Bruni d’Entrecasteaux’s expedition to “New Holland”, made what is considered to be the first definitive sighting of the Tasmanian tiger, on 13 May 1792. The last known Thylaicne died in the Hobart Zoo on 7 September 1936, a victim of exposure and starvation caused by lack of understanding of the animal’s needs. Since then, there have been numerous sightings of the Thylacine, but none have been confimed.

On this day ………… 5th February 2002

The Thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian tiger, was a carnivorous marsupial living in Australia, specifically the island of Tasmania, up until the twentieth century. Although sometimes known also as the Tasmanian wolf, this animal was neither a wolf nor a tiger, but a marsupial. It stood about 60cm tall, with a body length of up to 130cm, not including its tail, up to 66cm long. European settlement spelt doom for the Thylacine. Early settlers, fearing the Thylacine was a threat to their livestock, campaigned for the colonial government to offer a bounty for killing the animal. The last known Thylacine died in the Hobart Zoo in September 1936, a victim of exposure and the fact that the needs of these animals were simply not understood. Fossil evidence has shown that, besides being found in Tasmania, the Thylacine once existed on the Australian mainland as well as the island of New Guinea. Remains have been located on the Nullabor Plain, in South Australia’s mid north and around Adelaide, as well as in parts of Western Australia. On 5 February 2002, it was reported that scientists had uncovered two teeth from a Thylacine in a sink hole near Coffin Bay on South Australia’s Lower Eyre Peninsula in South Australia – the first ever found on Eyre Peninsula.

 

 

On this day …….. 7th September 1936

The Thylacine, more commonly known as the Tasmanian tiger, was a large carnivorous marsupial. Now believed to be extinct, the thylacine was coloured yellow-brown to grey, with dark stripes across its back from shoulders to tail. Limited to Tasmania in recent times, the discovery of fossils in mainland Australia suggests the thylacine was once widespread across the continent. Thylacines were perceived as a threat to livestock in Tasmania, and the government introduced a bounty in 1888: one pound for each adult scalp and 10 shillings for sub-adults. This, combined with the introduction of dogs, hastened the species’ decline and eventual wipeout. The last-known thylacine died in Hobart Zoo on September 7, 1936; this one was photographed in 1920.

 

On this day …….. 10th of July 1936

The Thylacine was a dasyurid, or carnivorous marsupial, living in Australia up until the twentieth century. It is believed that the Thylacine existed on the Australian mainland until the introduction of the dingo thousands of years ago. Although the Thylacine was often called the Tasmanian Tiger or Tasmanian Wolf, it was neither of these. Its body was similar in shape to that of the placental wolf, but it was a marsupial, putting it in an entirely different class. It stood 58-60cm tall, with a body and tail length of up to 180cm. When Europeans settled in Tasmania, the Thylacine’s fate was sealed. Farmers shot the creatures, fearing them as a threat to livestock, while hunters prized them as trophies; these acts were supported by the government of the time which offered a bounty of one pound for every dead adult Thylacine and ten shillings for each dead Thylacine joey. This bounty system, introduced in 1830, was not terminated until 1909. By this time, the Thylacine was very rare, and being sought for zoos worldwide. Australian authorities were slow to protect native wildlife, with the result that many species became extinct or on the verge of extinction. In a last attempt to protect the remaining specimens, Tasmania named the Thylacine a protected animal. On the 10th of July 1936, the governor of Tasmania, Sir Ernest Clark, announced that “… in exercise of the powers and authority conferred upon me by the Animals and Birds’ Protection Act, 1928, do, by this proclamation, transfer Native Tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus) from Schedule 3, Part 1, to Schedule 2, Part 1, of that Act …”. The last known specimen of the Thylacine died in the Hobart Zoo in September that same year. The last captive animals were exhibited in zoos, where their needs were not understood, and the Thylacines in Hobart died from exposure. Despite numerous apparent “sightings” over the years, not one of these has ever been confirmed, and in 1986, the Thylacine was officially classified as Extinct.

 

On this day …….. 13th May 1792

The Tasmanian tiger, known also by its palaeontological nickname of Thylacine, was a carnivorous marsupial of Australia. It was once believed to roam the entire Australian mainland, as well as parts of New Guinea. Its disappearance from the mainland is believed to have been due to increased competition for food which resulted from the introduction of the dingo by the Aborigines. The Thylacine was up to 110cm in length, with a strong, stiff tail that was half the length of its body again. At its shoulder, it stood about 60cm tall. The Thylacine had tawny grey-brown fur, and around 16 black or brown stripes on its back, mainly at the tail end. The first evidence of the existence of such a creature came when Abel Tasman discovered Tasmania, which he named Van Diemen’s Land, in 1642. Upon the shores of the island, one of Tasman’s crewman, F. Jacobszoon, described seeing “footprints not ill-resembling the claws of a tiger”. French exploration provided confirmation of the Tasmanian tiger when French naturalist Jacques-Julien Houtou de Labillardière, who was on Rear Admiral Bruni d’Entrecasteaux’s expedition to “New Holland”, made what is considered to be the first definitive sighting of the Tasmanian tiger, on 13 May 1792. The last known Thylaicne died in the Hobart Zoo on 7 September 1936, a victim of exposure and starvation caused by lack of understanding of the animal’s needs. Since then, there have been numerous sightings of the Thylacine, but none have been confimed.

On this day ………… 5th February 2002

The Thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian tiger, was a carnivorous marsupial living in Australia, specifically the island of Tasmania, up until the twentieth century. Although sometimes known also as the Tasmanian wolf, this animal was neither a wolf nor a tiger, but a marsupial. It stood about 60cm tall, with a body length of up to 130cm, not including its tail, up to 66cm long. European settlement spelt doom for the Thylacine. Early settlers, fearing the Thylacine was a threat to their livestock, campaigned for the colonial government to offer a bounty for killing the animal. The last known Thylacine died in the Hobart Zoo in September 1936, a victim of exposure and the fact that the needs of these animals were simply not understood. Fossil evidence has shown that, besides being found in Tasmania, the Thylacine once existed on the Australian mainland as well as the island of New Guinea. Remains have been located on the Nullabor Plain, in South Australia’s mid north and around Adelaide, as well as in parts of Western Australia. On 5 February 2002, it was reported that scientists had uncovered two teeth from a Thylacine in a sink hole near Coffin Bay on South Australia’s Lower Eyre Peninsula in South Australia – the first ever found on Eyre Peninsula.