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ON THIS DAY ……. 30th March 1905

A boy of 9 years, named Arthur Leggo, was run down by a tram, in Melbourne on this day in 1905. The boy was dragged a distance in Park Street, South Melbourne before the tram was able to stop. He sustained serious injuries to the head and numerous lacerations to his body.

 

 

On This Day – August 7, 1946

A man who is alleged to have driven a car through a tram safety zone in Fitzroy st, St Kilda, on August 7, knocking down four persons and killing an army officer, was yesterday committed for trial by Mr Marwick, coroner, who recorded a finding of manslaughter.

He is Harold James Hewitt Parker, 26, rubber worker, of Melville rd, West Brunswick. The army officer who received fatal injuries was Captain Sydney Gordon Reid, 29, of Queen’s rd, Albert Park.

Barbara Schooley, of Queen’s rd, Albert Park, a lieutenant in the AWAS, said she was standing in a safety zone near St Kilda station with Reid. She saw a car approach the zone, shouted a warning to Reid, and jumped clear.

Norman Alfred Bunney, taxi-driver, of Aspen st, Moonee Ponds, said he pursued the car along Fitzroy st. His speedometer had registered 57 mph. Before he reached the motorcar in front it crashed into the back of another taxi and came to rest in a rockery on the footpath.

First-constable George Ignatius Eccles alleged that Parker had called at West Brunswick police station at 1.30am on August 8. Parker, he said, claimed that he had been informed that he had killed a man. He had no recollection of the collision.

Mr Marwick granted bail of £300, with a surety of £300.

Mr M. Goldberg appeared for Parker.

ON THIS DAY …… 5th April 1929

SOUTH MELBOURNE

On this day in 1929 a motor car driven by Arthur Harold Buckland aged 33, a postal employee, collided with a tram in Clarendon street, South Melbourne. William Samuel Deveston, aged 37, who was riding in the motor, was fatally injured. The Coroner found that Buckland was guilty of manslaughter and committed him for trial. Witnesses declared that Buckland drove at an excessive speed, but Buckland swore that he was travelling at only 15 miles an hour, and that the occurrence was purely accidental.

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 30th March 1905

A boy of 9 years, named Arthur Leggo, was run down by a tram, in Melbourne on this day in 1905. The boy was dragged a distance before the tram was able to stop.

 

 

ON THIS DAY ……….. 16th March 1911

VERDICT OF MANSLAUGHTER

The inquiry into the death of Arthur Albert Ray, 46, who was knocked down by a tram in Spencer-street on March 16 and who died in the Melbourne Hospital two days later, was resumed by the Coroner on Saturday. The Coroner recorded a verdict that Thomas Davis was so negligent driving a car as to cause the death of Ray, and he found Davis is guilty of manslaughter. Davis was committed for trial.

 

 

On this day …….. 30th of December 1934

A strong trouser belt saved a boy from falling beneath the wheels of a fast moving tram on this day in 1934. Jumping on the tram in George Street West, Sydney, the youngster slipped and fell on the coupling ripped through his trousers and caught his belt. He was dragged along for some distance before the tram was stopped. The boy was unharmed.

 

On This Day – August 7, 1946

A man who is alleged to have driven a car through a tram safety zone in Fitzroy st, St Kilda, on August 7, knocking down four persons and killing an army officer, was yesterday committed for trial by Mr Marwick, coroner, who recorded a finding of manslaughter.

He is Harold James Hewitt Parker, 26, rubber worker, of Melville rd, West Brunswick. The army officer who received fatal injuries was Captain Sydney Gordon Reid, 29, of Queen’s rd, Albert Park.

Barbara Schooley, of Queen’s rd, Albert Park, a lieutenant in the AWAS, said she was standing in a safety zone near St Kilda station with Reid. She saw a car approach the zone, shouted a warning to Reid, and jumped clear.

Norman Alfred Bunney, taxi-driver, of Aspen st, Moonee Ponds, said he pursued the car along Fitzroy st. His speedometer had registered 57 mph. Before he reached the motorcar in front it crashed into the back of another taxi and came to rest in a rockery on the footpath.

First-constable George Ignatius Eccles alleged that Parker had called at West Brunswick police station at 1.30am on August 8. Parker, he said, claimed that he had been informed that he had killed a man. He had no recollection of the collision.

Mr Marwick granted bail of £300, with a surety of £300.

Mr M. Goldberg appeared for Parker.

ON THIS DAY …… 5th April 1929

SOUTH MELBOURNE

On this day in 1929 a motor car driven by Arthur Harold Buckland aged 33, a postal employee, collided with a tram in Clarendon street, South Melbourne. William Samuel Deveston, aged 37, who was riding in the motor, was fatally injured. The Coroner found that Buckland was guilty of manslaughter and committed him for trial. Witnesses declared that Buckland drove at an excessive speed, but Buckland swore that he was travelling at only 15 miles an hour, and that the occurrence was purely accidental.

 

ON THIS DAY ……. 30th March 1905

A boy of 9 years, named Arthur Leggo, was run down by a tram, in Melbourne on this day in 1905. The boy was dragged a distance before the tram was able to stop.

 

 

ON THIS DAY ……….. 16th March 1911

VERDICT OF MANSLAUGHTER

The inquiry into the death of Arthur Albert Ray, 46, who was knocked down by a tram in Spencer-street on March 16 and who died in the Melbourne Hospital two days later, was resumed by the Coroner on Saturday. The Coroner recorded a verdict that Thomas Davis was so negligent driving a car as to cause the death of Ray, and he found Davis is guilty of manslaughter. Davis was committed for trial.

 

 

In 1945, Lancelot (Lance) Leonard Hill returned home from the Second World War. He found his wife Sherry struggling to hang the washing between the overgrown trees in their back yard, so he took some old pipe, a welder and an innovative idea and created what was to become a world famous Australian Icon. The Hills Hoist was born. Word of Lance’s invention quickly spread until one day, on a tram on his way to work, Lance overheard two women talking about wanting a rotary clothes hoist they had seen in a friend’s yard. Lance got off the tram at the next stop, walked home and told Sherry that he was going into business to make the Hoist Hills Industries was born.

 

On the morning of July 20, 1952, the wheels of a Mosman tram locked. Despite the best efforts of the driver, the tram skidded more than a kilometre and a half downhill – at an estimated speed of over 70km/h – until it crashed through the blocks at the end of the rails, tore up almost 10 metres of road, and shot off the embankment, hurtling 18 metres through the air, onto rocks, and then into the harbour. The driver and conductor both suffered head injuries when they abandoned the tram during its descent. The two passengers left on board were also injured.