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Border Security: Australia’s Front Line is an Australian factual television program that airs on the Seven Network.

The show follows the work of officers of the Department of Home Affairs, Border Force, Quarantine and Inspection Service, as they enforce Australian immigration, customs, quarantine and finance laws. It also shows scenes from Sydney mail centre.

Most of the programme is filmed at Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney airports.

Occasionally, other locations such as Perth Airport, seaports, international mail centres, raids on workplaces suspected of employing persons contrary to the restrictions of their visa or immigrant status and the work of Australian Border Force vessels and aircraft in the waters of Northern Australia.

The series was renewed for a seventeenth season to air in 2018.

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Bluey was an Australia police drama series made by Crawford Production in Melbourne for the Seven Network. Which ran from the 2nd of August 1976 to the 25th of April 1977.

Stand-up comedian Lucky Grills was cast as the titular Det. Sergeant “Bluey” Hills.

Hills character was different to other detectives seen in Crawford’s previous shows. Being obese, heavily drinking, smoking, visited prostitutes, Hills character took on a life of its own.

Bluey was set at Melbourne’s Russell Street Police Headquarters, and many scenes were shot around South Melbourne.

“Bluey” Hills heading his own squad (“Department B”), due to his inability to work within the existing police squads.

Department B was given cases which the other departments could not solve by conventional means.  Hills applying his unconventional methods to bring about their resolution.

Bluey was supported in his investigations by newly assigned Det. Gary Dawson (John Diedrich) long-time cohort Sgt. Monica Rourke (Gerda Nicolson), and undercover officer Det. Sgt. Reg Truscott (Terry Gill), who spent his time ostensibly working as a small-time burglar, and supplying Bluey with information on the activities of local criminals. 

Unlike other Australian TV series at the time the entirely show shot on colour film.

The final episode “Son Of Bluey” featured an appearance by actor Don Barker as Det. Sgt. Harry White – the same character he played in Homicide television series.

Bluey found a new audience two decades later when the dubbed clips from the show formed the basis for the popular The Late Show comedy sketch “Bargearse”.

In addition to two guest appearances as himself, Grills also reprised his role as Bluey on The Late Show in order to protest the airing of the last Bargearse sketch.

Another enduring element from the show, the theme music, is now best associated with coverage of cricket from Nine Network’s Wide World of Sports.

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Blue Heelers is an Australian police drama series.  Produced by Southern Star Group and ran for 12 years on the Seven Network, from 1994 to 2006.

The series depicted the everyday lives and relationships of the residents of Mt Thomas (Williamstown), a fictional town in Victoria. The opening title sequence was filmed at Castlemaine, Victoria. 

The series focuses on the daily lives of police officers working at a police station in the fictional town of Mount Thomas.

Each episode is presented from the perspective of the officers.

On average, 42 episodes of Blue Heelers were broadcast per year on Australian television, with each episode comprising fifty scenes. One episode was made every week.

The scripts were written to a formula which allowed one day for rehearsal, two days on location and two days in the studio.  Episodes were shot eight to ten weeks ahead of their scheduled broadcast date.

Apart from the regular cast members, the show employed 4,300 guest actors annually, plus 30 extras every week. A total of 150 people were involved in the show’s production each week, including cast members, crew, wardrobe, publicists and writers.

Blue Heelers is regarded as one of the most successful programmes on Australian television.  Winning many awards, including 25 Logie Awards.  Blue Heelers was voted 37th greatest show on Australian television in the 50 Years 50 Show poll in 2005.

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The Big Steal is an Australian caper film directed by Nadia Tass starring Ben Mendelsohn, Claudia Karvan and Steve Bisley.

David Parker was the scriptwriter and cinematographer. The film won three Australian Film Institute awards. The film was released on the 20th of September 1990. 

The movie was shot from the 6th of November to the 22nd of December 1989.

The film follows a young Danny Clark (Ben Mendelsohn) and his mates Mark Jorgensen (Damon Harriman) and Vangeli Petrakis (Angelo D’Angelo).

As the film unravels you find that there is only two things in life Danny wants more than anything else, one is a Jaguar car and the other is Joanna Johnson (Claudia Karvan).

On Danny’s 18th birthday his parents give him their beloved 1963 Nissan Cedric, which he trades for a A Jaguar XJ6.  Danny works up the courage to ask Joanna out on a date.  One problem is that he tells her that he owns a Jaguar. 

Danny finds a second hand car dealership owned by Gordon Farkas (Steve Bisley).

Spotting Danny admiring a used 1973 XJ6 in the lot, Farkas pounces and uses all his charm, cunning and every used-car salesman trick in the book to convince Danny that this is the car for him.

With the deal done and the Cedric gone, Danny heads home with his new pride and joy. But this is where things start to unravel.

His father is not impressed about losing the Cedric, and while out on his long-awaited date with Joanna, the Jag’s engine blows up.

Danny is shattered, particularly when he upsets Joanna and she leaves him stranded alone in the empty streets with a broken-down car.

Closer inspection reveals the engines had been swapped after Danny had signed the contract, with a dud motor put in his car.

Realising he has been done-over by the crooked Farkas, Danny and his mates hatch a plan to get revenge over the shonky car salesman and hopefully win back the hand of the lovely Joanna.

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Big Girl’s Blouse is an Australian skit program that aired on the 13th of October 1994 on the Seven Network.

The show was created by Gin Riley, Jane Turner and Magda Szubanski who all went on to star in Kath and Kim. The show ran for one season with 9 half-hour episodes. 

The phrase “Big Girl’s Blouse” is a British English idiom meaning “ineffectual or weak, someone failing to show masculine strength or determination”.

Riley, Szubanski and Turner had all become recognisable faces from their time on sketch series Fast Forward, the creation of Steve Vizard and Andrew Knight.

Amidst the largely male team of comedians writing and appearing in the series, the trio (along with Marg Downey) had some of the most memorable characters and sketches, but it wasn’t until they were given their own series in 1994 that they carved out their own voice — the subtly subversive voice that would go on to be at the core of Kath and Kim.

The three comedians had to work hard to convince Vizard and Knight to give them their own special on Channel Seven, which was eventually turned into a series.

That series struggled in the ratings — it was scheduled up against the first season of ER — so was cancelled after just one season.

But the eight episodes were released on DVD in the early 2000s (after Kath and Kim became popular) and many of the sketches and characters have taken on a cult following thanks to YouTube.

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Bellbird is an Australian soap opera serial set in a small Victorian rural township. The series was produced by the ABC at its Ripponlea TV studios in Elsternwick, Melbourne. The opening title sequence was filmed at Daylesford, Victoria. 

The series was produced between the 28th of August 1967 and the 23rd of December 1977.

Although not the first Australian soap opera it was the first successful soap opera and even spanned a feature film and tie-in novel. The show’s ratings were modest but it had a devoted following, especially in rural Australia. 

The show followed the lives of people living in the fictional town of Bellbird. 

During its 10-year production run, 15-minute episodes of Bellbird screened from Monday through to Thursday nights during the lead in to the 7 pm evening news bulletin.

In 1976 the series was screened as one one-hour episode each week, before switching to three half-hour installments per week during its final season.

The series was the first soap opera in Australia to spin-off into a feature film version and tie-in novel, entitled Country Town (1971), it focused on Bellbird’s problems during a severe drought. The movie’s script was also novelized. 

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Donald Maxfield was reported missing from Colac on the 13th of May, 1953. On the 1st of August 1953, the torso of a man was pulled from the Barwon River. Divers would eventually find the rest of Maxfield’s body, which had been dismembered and placed in kerosene tins and sunk in the Barwon River. ⁣

It was believed the Maxfield was attacked and bashed in a garage in Colac by two men. The men had placed the unconscious body of Maxfield in the boot of a car and had driven to Geelong. Maxfield regained consciousness and was again bashed to death on the banks of the Barwon. It was reported that this was a payback as it was believed that Maxfield had been a police informant against one of the men.⁣

The two men would later be arrested and information from them would lead to finding the rest of Maxfields body by divers recovering the torso after a 5 hour search of the river. The torso had been covered in an oat sack, wrapped in wire and weighed down with stone weights so that it was roughly 100lbs. The head and hands were later discovered in kerosene tins in the river. ⁣

Both men were charged with murder and sentenced to life imprisonment and 20 years respectively.⁣

Bargearse was an Australian comedy TV series. Made by the Late Show on the ABC from the 18th of July 1992 to the 30th of October 1993. 

Produced by Michael Hirsh, and directed by Santo Cilauro, Tony Martin and Mick Molloy. 

Bargearse was an overdubbed version of Bluey, a 1976 Crawford production police drama set in Melbourne, Australia.

The segment was originally to be an overdubbing of an Australian soap opera, The Young Doctors, titled “Medical Hospital”, but the rights to the footage were pulled at the last minute.

The ABC series Truckies was considered for overdubbing in a segment intended to be titled “Truck Wits”, before the writers settled on Bluey.

This change left the writers with very little time, and as a result the planned 20 short episodes was cut down to 10, which aired in the second half of series two.

Bargearse was named after its protagonist, Detective Sergeant Bargearse, an overweight, moustache-sporting “rough-and-tumble” cop.

The sketches exploited Bluey’s weight with plentiful fat jokes, as well as many fart noises.

Bargearse was voiced by Tony Martin, while his sidekicks, Ann Bourke (Judith Lucy) and Detective Glen Twenty (Rob Sitch), Natalie Thigh-Blaster (Jane Kennedy), Natalie Thigh-Blaster).Chromedome (Mick Molloy) and Poloneck (Santo Cilauro).

Lucky Grills, who played Bluey, appeared on The Late Show three times: as a guest in the mock press conference for the Biodome participants, as the character Bluey protesting the last episode of Bargearse and in the musical appearance as noted above.

On the 15th of August 2007 a Bargearse and The Olden Days double feature DVD was released.

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Marjorie Hemmerde, 106, Enjoys ‘Living In Sin’ With 73-year-old Boy Toy, Gavin Crawford.

Marjorie Hemmerde is dating a man 33 years younger, but no one is accusing her of robbing the cradle.  Hemmerde is 106 and her “boy toy,” Gavin Crawford, is 73. The two have managed to find love despite their massive age difference.

The two met three years ago at Kew Gardens, an old folks home in the Australian town of Kew, Victoria, and are now inseparable.⁣

A shocking tragedy occurred to-day at the Sir Walter Scott Hotel, at the corner of Elizabeth and Franklin-street, city. A⁣ young man, John Tunks, cutting the throat of Amelia Dean, a barmaid, with a razor, and then inflicting frightful injuries upon himself with the same instrument. He died within an hour, and the woman is in. a critical condition. ⁣ ⁣

The crime was committed in a bedroom on the first floor⁣ of the hotel, and the first intimation the other inmates had of the occurrence was the sight of Mrs. Dean rushing downstairs with blood flowing from a gash in her throat, followed by the man, similarly wounded. He was in a shocking condition, and had barely reached the foot of the stairs when he collapsed. It was evident from the nature of his injuries that he had used the razor with⁣ frenzied determination. Mrs. Dean, who was also very weak, staggered towards several of the inmates of the hotel, who were conversing near the door, exclaiming⁣ “Jack done, it. Jack done it.”⁣ ⁣

The pair were promptly removed to the Melbourne Hospital, and it was then seen that the man’s end was near. Mrs. Dean’s recovery is regarded as doubtful. A blood-stained razor was found lying at the foot of one of the two beds in the room from which the man and woman came. Both beds were also blood-stained, and there was a trail of blood from one bed through the door and down the stairway.

There were signs that a struggle had taken⁣ place.⁣ ⁣

Amelia Dean died 6 weeks later ⁣ ⁣

Bad Eggs is an Australian comedy movie. Written and directed by Tony Martin and Producted by Macquarie Film Corporation with a budget of A$4.5 million. The film was released on the 25th of July 2003.

Ben Kinnear (Mick Molloy) and (Bob Franklin) Mike Paddock are detectives with the Melbourne Police force’s elite Zero Tolerance Unit.

When a freak accident involving a dead magistrate  named Poulgrain lands them on the front page of the local paper, Ben and Mike are busted and demoted down to uniformed duties.

Things get worse when they pay a visit to the Magistrate’s widow Eleanor (Robyn Nevin) and accidentally burn her house down.

Things become more complicated when Julie Bale (Judith Lucy), a journalist and a former police-officer and onetime partner of Kinnear’s, is arrested on a charge of blackmailing the Magistrate.

But when Ben discovers a strange link between the accident and the business affairs of a shady casino boss he and Mike have been investigating, the pair decide they can no longer turn a blind eye to the corruption rife amongst their own colleagues.  

Interesting filming fact about Bad Eggs, Peter Aanensen is playing “Arthur Ferris”, the same character he played in the classic Aussie police television drama Bluey (1976). Ferris, who was Bluey Hills’ superior in the third series, is in this film seen working as a security guard at Victoria’s Parliament House.

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All Together Now was an Australian sitcom that was broadcast on Nine Network between 1991 and 1993. 

The premise involved an aging rocker (Jon English) trying to maintain his music career while living with his son and daughter. For an undetermined number of initial episodes filmed prior to public broadcast, the show title was “Rhythm and Blues” and had a different theme song.

At the 1992 Logie Awards, the show and its actors were nominated for four awards:

The show (Most Popular Light Entertainment/Comedy Program)

Rebecca Gibney (Most Popular Actress, and Most Popular Light Entertainment/Comedy Female Performer)

Jon English (Most Popular Light Entertainment/Comedy Male Performer)

The show was also nominated at the 1993 Logie Awards, again for Most Popular Comedy Program, as was Jon English for Most Popular Comedy Personality.

visit www.twistedhistory.net.au