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On This Day ……. 3rd of August 1887

David Craweonr, pawnbroker, pleaded guilty on the charges of using false
pretences, on this day in 1887. He was sentenced to two years imprisonment in the Geelong gaol with hard labor. His Honour said that due to the prisoner’s age he would refrain from adding to the sentence terms of solitary confinement.

 

On This Day ……. 2nd of August 1887

An aged inmate of the Geelong gaol named John Lynch, died at about 7:30pm on this day in 1887, in the hospital attached to that institution. An enquiry will be held upon the remains at 9 o’clock in the morning, before Mr Pardey, J.P.

 

On This Day ……. 2nd of August 1875

A prisoner named George Buckley, undergoing a sentence of 12 months for vagrancy, and who was transferred from the Melbourne Gaol in April last died at the Geelong Gaol on this day in 1875 from phthisis. An inquest was held, and a verdict returned in accordance with the facts of the case.

 

On This Day ……. 31st of July 1890

An inquiry into the supposed murder of George Avery, at the Camperdown Hotel, the particulars of which appeared in The Argus, was commenced in the Camperdown Police Court on this day in 1890, Mr. Heron, P. M. , and a jury of five. A man who occupied the same room with Avery on the night the fatal blow was struck, and who disappeared the next morning, was present in custody, having been arrested yesterday in a hut on Mr. Thomas Shaw’s Wooriwyrite Station, about 17 miles from here. He is a man about 58 years of age, strongly built, has a very marked Scottish accent, and gives the name of William Tudehook. For two days and nights the police have been scouring the country in search of this man. They were accompanied by Mr. Henry, the landlord of the hotel, in order that he might identity the man, who had been at his hotel on the previous Saturday night. When the man was seen at the hotel he carried a bush walking stick, but,when arrested the stick could nowhere be found, and he stated to the police that he had thrown it away. At the inquest, Dr. Pettigrew described the nature of the wound on the top of the deceased’s head, which appeared to have beeninflicted by some sharp instrument, and could not from its position have been easily caused by a fall. Some men who were about the hotel gave formal evidence. Senior constable Quinn, who arrested the prisoner, gave the substance of a conversation he had with him. The prisoner stated that when he left the room on Sunday morning the deceased was in bed, and that he did not notice anything peculiar about him. During the night Avery and he had a conversation in which Avery told him that he had had some trouble with his family, but beyond this nothing more passed between the prisoner and the deceased. The prisoner is a stranger in this district, and unknown to the police. He was remanded to the Geelong Gaol, and the inquiry was adjourned until August 19, to allow the police to collect further evidence.

 

On This Day ……. 29th of July 1913

A very bright service was conducted at the Geelong gaol on this day in 1913, by
Rev. Robert Kelly, who was accompanied by a small party of ladies to assist the music. Thirty-three of the prismiers took part, and entered into the singing most heartily. Mr. Kelly addressed them briefly, and the rest of the service consisted of solos and duets by Mrs. Clias. Fagg, Miss Elsie Fagg, Miss Rita Robertson, Miss Georgo (Miss McDonald assisting with the accompaniments) and hymns.

 

Animal Kingdom is a 2010 Australian crime drama film written and directed by David Michôd, and shot on location in Melbourne with a budget of A$5 million from Screen Australia, Film Victoria, Screen NSW and Showtime Australia.  The film premiered at the 26th Sundance Film Festival on the 22nd of January 2010. 

Michôd’s script was inspired by events which involved the Pettingill criminal family  of Melbourne, Australia. In 1991, two brothers Trevor Pettingill and Victor Pierce (along with two other men: Anthony Leigh Farrell and Peter David McEvoy) were acquitted in the 1988 shooting murder of two Victorian police officers.

After his mother overdoses, 17-year-old Joshua “J” Cody (James Frecheville) asks his estranged grandmother, Janine “Smurf” Cody (Jacki Weaver), for help, and she invites him to move in with her.

Smurf is the affectionate matriarch of a Melbourne Crime family that uses her home as a base. Her home is also being watched by cops who are looking for the oldest son, Andrew “Pope” Cody (Ben Mendelsohn), who is in hiding. The volatile middle brother, Craig (Sullivan Stapleton), deals drugs successfully enough to have bought the house for his mother.

The youngest brother, Darren (Luke Ford), follows the lead of his siblings, while family friend “Baz” leads the gang, which specializes in armed robbery. Craig takes J along to meet with a crooked cop from the drug squad, who tells him that renegade cops on the armed robbery squad are on the look out for all of them.

Later, Baz goes to meet Pope at a shopping centre, where they discuss quitting crime and going straight. As Baz gets in his car to leave, police approach and shoot him dead. Angry and distraught, Pope and Craig want revenge, and ask J to steal a Commodore and bring it to Darren’s place.

The car is then planted in the middle of a night-time street as a lure. Two policemen are soon drawn to the scene, where they are ambushed and shot dead by Pope and Craig. The next day, Pope, Darren and J are taken in for questioning, where J meets Detective Senior Sergeant Nathan Leckie who also leads the armed robbery squad. Leckie, one of the few non-corrupt police officers, recognizes J’s predicament and begins to lean on him. The three are later released from custody, but J returns with his girlfriend Nicky to her parents’ home.

Craig, who has avoided being picked up by the police, Pope, Darren and Smurf meet at a diner, where they recognize J as the weak link. When told by Smurf to give himself up for questioning, Craig panics, and meets a friend in rural Bendigo. He learns that the house is already being monitored, and as the police arrive tries to flee through a field but is gunned down.

Pope and Darren take J to meet their solicitor Ezra. He coaches him to not tell the police anything and pressure him to break up with Nicky, which he does. Leckie takes J into custody again, where he proposes that J be moved to witness protection, but J turns down the offer. Meanwhile, Nicky, unsure what to do, shows up at Smurf’s home, where Pope gives her heroin, questions her, then smothers her to death to keep her silent.

When J returns to Smurf’s house the next morning he discovers Nicky’s bracelet outside the house. He calls Nicky’s phone, and realising something is not right, flees to Nicky’s parents’ house. Pope gets Nicky’s address from Darren and arrives in time to intercept J. J flees on foot and is taken into a safe house. With Craig and Baz dead, Pope and Darren imprisoned, and J potentially being the star witness for the prosecution, Smurf decides, “J needs to go”.

Smurf uses her connections to procure J’s address, and persuades the corrupt cop to help her. Police from the drug squad then raid the safe house. J jumps a fence and returns to Smurf’s house, saying he wishes to help free Pope and Darren from jail. To do this, the family’s barrister then coaches J’s answers.

After his day in court, Leckie sees J before his departure from the safe hotel, and asks him if he has found his place in the world (a reference to Leckie’s animal kingdom metaphor for J’s predicament). Pope, Darren and Smurf celebrate with champagne while being interviewed after their controversial acquittal. Smurf later sees Leckie in the supermarket and taunts him. Later again, J returns to Smurf’s home asking to stay, before going to his room.

Pope enters and begins to talk to him, but is cut off when J shoots him in the head. In the final scene, J returns to the living room and embraces a now silenced Smurf.

Animal Kingdom received 18 nominations for the 2010 Australian Film Institute Awards, across all major feature film categories – a record achievement. On the 11th of December 2010, Animal Kingdom won a record 10 awards.

The film received several other film awards to Jacki Weaver who was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress. Weaver was also nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. It was also named one of the Top Independent Films of 2010 at the National Board of Review Awards.  All up the film received 36 awards and 39 nominations. 

Quentin Tarantino listed Animal Kingdom as his third favourite film of 2010, behind Toy Story 3 and The Social Network. 

ON THIS DAY…… 30th September 1865

An escape was made by two prisoners from the gaol, named William Henry Thompson and Thomas Reynolds. The former was undergoing a sentence of three years for stealing in the Queen’s Head Hotel, and had been in confinement about fourteen months ; the latter was also undergoing a similar sentence for assaulting an old man and had served half his time. It appears that the prisoners acted as cooks, and at a quarter to six o’clock were let into the kitchen to prepare breakfast. The kitchen is situated in the new wing of the building, and is the only part of it which is not surrounded by the high wall. The windows are protected by strong iron bars, about six inches apart, and which were supposed to be imbedded into the bluestone some two and a half inches. One inch, however, was all that the bar, which was wrenched by the aid of two pieces of wood, had been so fixed. At a few minutes before six one of the warders on his way to the gaol noticed three men standing near to the Pivot Hotel, about a hundred yards from the gaol, fancying that one of them was like Reynolds, he challenged him, saying, “Is that you, Reynolds?” The words were no sooner uttered than the three men separated, the stranger making tracks towards town, and Thompson making a bolt towards Chilwell. The warder, whose name was Kerley, let them go, but made sure of Reynolds, and at a quarter past six that worthy was comfortably ‘installed in his cell. Another of the warders coming across the flat noticed Thompson, and identified him as a prisoner by the brand on his trousers. He immediately started in pursuit, and Thompson, who ran like a deer, headed towards Chilwell, brandishing a knife before him. The chase lasted for a mile and a half, while in turning to attract the attention of the police the warder missed sight of Thompson, who had cleared a fence in gallant style, and disappeared in a Mr. Dobson’s garden, near the Cremorne Hotel. Here the scent was lost, but there is little doubt that Thompson, who is a most desperate character, will soon be safely lodged in the gaol, as active search was being made for him yesterday. When last seen he had a small bundle under his arm, supposed to contain a change of clothes. Of the third man nothing, we believe, has been seen. His part in the business, it is supposed, was that of outside assistant.” Reynolds received an additional 12 months while Thompson was recaptured in Adelaide.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 30th September 1865

An escape was made by two prisoners from the gaol, named William Henry Thompson and Thomas Reynolds. The former was undergoing a sentence of three years for stealing in the Queen’s Head Hotel, and had been in confinement about fourteen months ; the latter was also undergoing a similar sentence for assaulting an old man and had served half his time. It appears that the prisoners acted as cooks, and at a quarter to six o’clock were let into the kitchen to prepare breakfast. The kitchen is situated in the new wing of the building, and is the only part of it which is not surrounded by the high wall. The windows are protected by strong iron bars, about six inches apart, and which were supposed to be imbedded into the bluestone some two and a half inches. One inch, however, was all that the bar, which was wrenched by the aid of two pieces of wood, had been so fixed. At a few minutes before six one of the warders on his way to the gaol noticed three men standing near to the Pivot Hotel, about a hundred yards from the gaol, fancying that one of them was like Reynolds, he challenged him, saying, “Is that you, Reynolds?” The words were no sooner uttered than the three men separated, the stranger making tracks towards town, and Thompson making a bolt towards Chilwell. The warder, whose name was Kerley, let them go, but made sure of Reynolds, and at a quarter past six that worthy was comfortably ‘installed in his cell. Another of the warders coming across the flat noticed Thompson, and identified him as a prisoner by the brand on his trousers. He immediately started in pursuit, and Thompson, who ran like a deer, headed towards Chilwell, brandishing a knife before him. The chase lasted for a mile and a half, while in turning to attract the attention of the police the warder missed sight of Thompson, who had cleared a fence in gallant style, and disappeared in a Mr. Dobson’s garden, near the Cremorne Hotel. Here the scent was lost, but there is little doubt that Thompson, who is a most desperate character, will soon be safely lodged in the gaol, as active search was being made for him yesterday. When last seen he had a small bundle under his arm, supposed to contain a change of clothes. Of the third man nothing, we believe, has been seen. His part in the business, it is supposed, was that of outside assistant.” Reynolds received an additional 12 months while Thompson was recaptured in Adelaide.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 29th September 1906

The eccentric conduct of a Chinaman named Hey Soon, a month ago led lo his being sent to the Geelong gaol, and he became so much enamoured of that establishment that when his term of imprisonment expired on this day on 1906 he refused to leave. He would not even part with his prison clothes, and when an attempt was made to dispossess him of tho garments he became, so excited that it was not deemed advisable then to release him. He was formally charged with offensive behaviour at the police court, and remanded for one week.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 28th September 1904

Mary Bowman, the female swindler whose career in the Geelong district was short but lively, appeared at the police court before the police magistrate Mr. Patterson and Messrs. Pardey and Douglass, J’s.P. The prisoner, whose original name appears to be Mary Jean Sinclair, was charged with having, by false representations, obtained the sum of £1 from Mrs. Augustina Ran. of Germantown, and being a rogue and a vagabond. There were several other charges against her. and after a discussion with the P.M. as to the penalty she was liable to, it was decided by the police to rely on the one charge. The defendant, who presented a sullen attitude in the box, and would, not face the court, pleaded guilty. Augustina Ran gave evidence that she had a farm of four acres at Germantown. Accused came to her place on 19th September, and said she wanted to purchase a farm. Witness said the price was £325, and told her to do business with her son. Accused remained at the house that night and said she had a groat big station behind Colac, and gave her a cheque for £70 as part of the”purchase money. She said she had not enough money to pay a small account, and asked the witness for the loan of £1. promising to return two pounds for the one. “Witness said to her, “I don’t want two; I only want my own back.” Accused left next morning, and she did not get her pound back, and found the cheque valueless. Sergeant Hore, admitted that the accused, showing that she had been 17 years in gaol out, over the last 25 years in the country since she arrived from Glasgow. See was sent to Geelong Gaol.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 27th September 1852

An interesting attempt of an escape was made by three prisoners on the 24th of September 1852. Three prisoners had by some means obtained possession of a
small saw and a jemmy bar, which they used to cut away part of the roof, half an inch steel plate. The prisoners had also stolen fat from the kitchen which they carefully filled up the hole, remarkably matching the colour of the fat to the ceiling. Before the prisoners could escape Warden Brodie noticed the fat on the ceiling and on examining realised there was a large hole. Warden Brodie succeeded in getting the jemmy bar, but could not find the saw. Immediately on finding this out, the warden applied to the Visiting Justice of the Peace for an order to put the men in irons, which was granted.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 26th September 1903

Rathor than submit to an order made by the police magistrate, requiring him to pay a small sum weekly towards the State pension drawn by his mother, a, wood merchant, named T. J. Powell, doing a good business in Autumn-street, Geelong West, was arrested, and taken to gaol on this day in 1903 to undergo a two week’s imprisonment, being the alternative to the non-payment of the money.