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On this day …….. 9th of October 1865

An inquest was held at Stieglitz, on this day in 1865, at the Victoria Hotel, on the body of Thomas Hatch.  The deceased a miner at the Sailor’s Reef shaft, Stieglitz was killed when he was jammed between a large rock and the side of the drive. The rock was about five feet in height, and reached to the upper part of deceased’s chest, pressing him closely to the wall.

Witnesses took pickaxes, and examined the drive, and commenced to take the body out by breaking the stone which held him in the position described.

The drive was about four and a half feet by seven feet in length. The stone was black slate and wedge shape, about a ton and a half in weignt, about eighteen inches at the base, and tapering to a point. The thick edge of the stone lay against the back of the deceased.

The body was removed to the cellar of the Victoria Hotel, Molesworth Street, where an autopsy determined a  verdict “Accidental Death, and no blame attachable to the managers of the mine.”

On this day …….. 25th of September 1861

An inquest was held on this day, at Mr. Goulden’s, the Victoria Hotel, Molesworth Street, Stieglitz on the body of Robert M’Farlane, miner killed at the Portuguese Reef.

Foster Shaw, Esq., the coroner, and a respectable jury, proceeded to a tent at the rear of the hotel where the deceased body had been placed.  On examination it was found that he had received several severe bruises on the back, of the head, the right arm was broken, and the left leg also broken, several severe cuts and bruises in other parts of his person, and fracture of the right arm and left leg.

A verdict “Accidental Death, and no blame attachable to the managers of the mine.” Due to a large sandstone block falling a distance of about eight feet crushing M’Farlane.

A very large and respectable assemblage performed the last duty in attending the deceased to his resting place in the new cemetery, Stieglitz. There being

no Presbyterian minister resident on the field, to which church the unfortunate deceased belonged, the Church of England service was read in a most impressive manner by Mr Lee.

ON THIS DAY…… 6th October 1902

A man giving the name of Henley Henry, and describing himself as a draper from Melbourne, was discovered by night in the Victoria Hotel, Malop-street, Geelong upstairs, trying to open several bedroom doors and tampering with the side entrance to one of the sample-rooms, he was placed under arrest, and appeared before Sir. Patterson, on this day in 1902. He stated he was muddled with drink, and excused himself by urging that he was looking for an empty room in which to sleep. He acknowledged he had only recently completed a term in gaol for larceny, and the Bench committed him to the Geelong gaol for six months.

 

ON THIS DAY – January 3, 1914

The death by violence of William Henry Anstis, 61 years of age, of Tallygaroopna, towards the hour of midnight, on this day in 1914, was quickly followed by the arrest of his alleged assailant, Orville Byron Randall, aged 30, on a charge of wilful murder. The scene of the tragedy was the verandah of the Victoria Hotel, and the hour 11.30 p.m., or there abouts. During the evening four men, among others, were at the hotel, namely the deceased man, Anstis, the accused, Randall, and two others named Bolger and Wosler. Randall was very drunk, and about 10.30 p.m. he lay down under the verandah with the intention, apparently, of “sleeping off ” the effects of his too liberal potations. Towards the closing hour, 11.30pm, Bolger and the deceased turned their thoughts homewards, and they proceeded to arouse the sleeping man so as to put him on his way to his bed. They succeeded in getting him to his legs, when accused is alleged to have said, “Leavc me alone. I am all right. If you don’t, I will stouch you.” Anstis, who was a Cornishman, and, though by no means pugnacious, would assert his right, is said to have replied, “Don’t talk about that, because I can put you on the broad of your back in no time.” The reply, it is said, was a blow on the jaw or chin, which felled Anstis to the ground. There was no thought among the onlookers that a tragedy had taken place and that they were facing death. Anstis was lifted up by Randall and Bolger, and placed within the gate for a time, how long is not yet known. It was thought that, in the language of the ring, he had been merely “knocked out.” Bolger and accused then went home.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 6th October 1902

A man giving the name of Henley Henry, and describing himself as a draper from Melbourne, was discovered by night in the Victoria Hotel, Malop-street, Geelong upstairs, trying to open several bedroom doors and tampering with the side entrance to one of the sample-rooms, he was placed under arrest, and appeared before Sir. Patterson, on this day in 1902. He stated he was muddled with drink, and excused himself by urging that he was looking for an empty room in which to sleep. He acknowledged he had only recently completed a term in gaol for larceny, and the Bench committed him to the Geelong gaol for six months.

 

ON THIS DAY – January 3, 1914

The death by violence of William Henry Anstis, 61 years of age, of Tallygaroopna, towards the hour of midnight, on this day in 1914, was quickly followed by the arrest of his alleged assailant, Orville Byron Randall, aged 30, on a charge of wilful murder. The scene of the tragedy was the verandah of the Victoria Hotel, and the hour 11.30 p.m., or there abouts. During the evening four men, among others, were at the hotel, namely the deceased man, Anstis, the accused, Randall, and two others named Bolger and Wosler. Randall was very drunk, and about 10.30 p.m. he lay down under the verandah with the intention, apparently, of “sleeping off ” the effects of his too liberal potations. Towards the closing hour, 11.30pm, Bolger and the deceased turned their thoughts homewards, and they proceeded to arouse the sleeping man so as to put him on his way to his bed. They succeeded in getting him to his legs, when accused is alleged to have said, “Leavc me alone. I am all right. If you don’t, I will stouch you.” Anstis, who was a Cornishman, and, though by no means pugnacious, would assert his right, is said to have replied, “Don’t talk about that, because I can put you on the broad of your back in no time.” The reply, it is said, was a blow on the jaw or chin, which felled Anstis to the ground. There was no thought among the onlookers that a tragedy had taken place and that they were facing death. Anstis was lifted up by Randall and Bolger, and placed within the gate for a time, how long is not yet known. It was thought that, in the language of the ring, he had been merely “knocked out.” Bolger and accused then went home.