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According to statistics from the Victorian Injury Surveillance Unit, 28,128 Victorians were injured by animals between July 2004 and June 2007, that is nearly 10 000 a year. But to break that down, almost 7700 Victorians have been taken to hospital during this time after being attacked by dogs. Horses were second on the list, killing two people and injuring a further 5628. Mosquito killed two people and sent 256 more to hospital. 9922 Victorians were hurt by creepy-crawlies, including spiders, bees, wasps, ticks, ants, centipedes and even scorpions. More unusual statistics were that close to 50 Victorians were attacked by monkeys. Family pets such as cats, rabbits and guinea pigs injured 1117 people, and 450 people ended up at a hospital with insects stuck in eyes, nose or ears. Chickens injured 92 people, and stingrays over 50 people. Six people had to be treated after encountering ducks and alpacas. Wombats, kangaroos, wallabies, possums and dingoes were responsible for attacks on 231 people. And 1153 Victorians were attacked in their sleep or while resting or eating.

 

On this day …….. 14th of July 1770

The kangaroo is a native Australian marsupial, of which there are over 60 species. The kangaroo family includes wallabies, tree kangaroos, wallaroos, pademelons, rat-kangaroos and the quokka, all of which are classifed as macropods. Because the larger species – the Red and Grey Kangaroos – are plentiful throughout the continent, the kangaroo has long been regarded as symbolic of Australia. Even though James Cook was not the first European to discover Australia, he and his crew were the first known Europeans to sight the kangaroo. As Cook sailed up the east coast of the continent, mapping the coastline, his ship, the “Endeavour” struck the Great Barrier Reef and nearly sank. The Endeavour was eventually brought for repairs into the harbour formed by the Endeavour River. Landing on the 10th of June 1770, Cook and his crew spent almost two months repairing the ship, allowing botanist Sir Joseph Banks ample time to study the flora and fauna of the area. On the 14th of July 1770, a crewman shot a strange looking, unknown animal. The creature was brought back to the camp site for examination, and the skin eventually taken back to England. The word “kangaroo” is believed to have come from the Aboriginal word gangurru, a Guugu Yimidhirr word referring to the Grey Kangaroo. The word was recorded by Sir Joseph Banks as “kangaru” or “kanguroo” (sources vary). It is not true that the word means “I don’t understand”; this is a popular myth often applied to various other Aboriginal-based Australian words.

 

According to statistics from the Victorian Injury Surveillance Unit, 28,128 Victorians were injured by animals between July 2004 and June 2007, that is nearly 10 000 a year. But to break that down, almost 7700 Victorians have been taken to hospital during this time after being attacked by dogs. Horses were second on the list, killing two people and injuring a further 5628. Mosquito killed two people and sent 256 more to hospital. 9922 Victorians were hurt by creepy-crawlies, including spiders, bees, wasps, ticks, ants, centipedes and even scorpions. More unusual statistics were that close to 50 Victorians were attacked by monkeys. Family pets such as cats, rabbits and guinea pigs injured 1117 people, and 450 people ended up at a hospital with insects stuck in eyes, nose or ears. Chickens injured 92 people, and stingrays over 50 people. Six people had to be treated after encountering ducks and alpacas. Wombats, kangaroos, wallabies, possums and dingoes were responsible for attacks on 231 people. And 1153 Victorians were attacked in their sleep or while resting or eating.

 

On this day …….. 14th of July 1770

The kangaroo is a native Australian marsupial, of which there are over 60 species. The kangaroo family includes wallabies, tree kangaroos, wallaroos, pademelons, rat-kangaroos and the quokka, all of which are classifed as macropods. Because the larger species – the Red and Grey Kangaroos – are plentiful throughout the continent, the kangaroo has long been regarded as symbolic of Australia. Even though James Cook was not the first European to discover Australia, he and his crew were the first known Europeans to sight the kangaroo. As Cook sailed up the east coast of the continent, mapping the coastline, his ship, the “Endeavour” struck the Great Barrier Reef and nearly sank. The Endeavour was eventually brought for repairs into the harbour formed by the Endeavour River. Landing on the 10th of June 1770, Cook and his crew spent almost two months repairing the ship, allowing botanist Sir Joseph Banks ample time to study the flora and fauna of the area. On the 14th of July 1770, a crewman shot a strange looking, unknown animal. The creature was brought back to the camp site for examination, and the skin eventually taken back to England. The word “kangaroo” is believed to have come from the Aboriginal word gangurru, a Guugu Yimidhirr word referring to the Grey Kangaroo. The word was recorded by Sir Joseph Banks as “kangaru” or “kanguroo” (sources vary). It is not true that the word means “I don’t understand”; this is a popular myth often applied to various other Aboriginal-based Australian words.

 

According to statistics from the Victorian Injury Surveillance Unit, 28,128 Victorians were injured by animals between July 2004 and June 2007, that is nearly 10 000 a year. But to break that down, almost 7700 Victorians have been taken to hospital during this time after being attacked by dogs. Horses were second on the list, killing two people and injuring a further 5628. Mosquito killed two people and sent 256 more to hospital. 9922 Victorians were hurt by creepy-crawlies, including spiders, bees, wasps, ticks, ants, centipedes and even scorpions. More unusual statistics were that close to 50 Victorians were attacked by monkeys. Family pets such as cats, rabbits and guinea pigs injured 1117 people, and 450 people ended up at a hospital with insects stuck in eyes, nose or ears. Chickens injured 92 people, and stingrays over 50 people. Six people had to be treated after encountering ducks and alpacas. Wombats, kangaroos, wallabies, possums and dingoes were responsible for attacks on 231 people. And 1153 Victorians were attacked in their sleep or while resting or eating.

 

On this day …….. 14th of July 1770

The kangaroo is a native Australian marsupial, of which there are over 60 species. The kangaroo family includes wallabies, tree kangaroos, wallaroos, pademelons, rat-kangaroos and the quokka, all of which are classifed as macropods. Because the larger species – the Red and Grey Kangaroos – are plentiful throughout the continent, the kangaroo has long been regarded as symbolic of Australia. Even though James Cook was not the first European to discover Australia, he and his crew were the first known Europeans to sight the kangaroo. As Cook sailed up the east coast of the continent, mapping the coastline, his ship, the “Endeavour” struck the Great Barrier Reef and nearly sank. The Endeavour was eventually brought for repairs into the harbour formed by the Endeavour River. Landing on the 10th of June 1770, Cook and his crew spent almost two months repairing the ship, allowing botanist Sir Joseph Banks ample time to study the flora and fauna of the area. On the 14th of July 1770, a crewman shot a strange looking, unknown animal. The creature was brought back to the camp site for examination, and the skin eventually taken back to England. The word “kangaroo” is believed to have come from the Aboriginal word gangurru, a Guugu Yimidhirr word referring to the Grey Kangaroo. The word was recorded by Sir Joseph Banks as “kangaru” or “kanguroo” (sources vary). It is not true that the word means “I don’t understand”; this is a popular myth often applied to various other Aboriginal-based Australian words.