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On this day …….. 9th September 1949

The “Murray bunyip” has been sighted again. Mr. Brian Blake, of St. Kilda,
who is visiting a relative in Wentworth, South West New South Wales, said he had seen the creature swimming in the Darling River, at the rear of the district hospital. He described it as being about 3ft. long with a thick neck and a strange-looking head. “I first saw it at night,” he said. “At first it looked like a dog with a shiny coat and long, drooping ears. “It dived under the water and stayed there for a long time. It made a noise like, a loud grunt.” The creature, “was also seen in the same place a couple of days later. Other people who saw it were Mr. Blake’s mother and two other women. Expert opinion is that the strange animal recently seen was a seal escaped from circus.

 

Wentworth is an Australian television drama series. It was first broadcast on SoHo on 1 May 2013. The series serves as a contemporary reimagining of Prisoner, which ran on Network Ten from 1979 to 1986. Lara Radulovich and David Hannam developed Wentworth from Reg Watson’s original concept. The series is set in the modern day and begins with Bea Smith (Danielle Cormack)’s early days in prison. One of the main characters is Liz Birdsworth. Liz Birdsworth is sentenced to 11 years for Manslaughter, dangerous driving causing death, and driving under the influence. Liz drank a whole bottle of vodka due to stress of organising her mother-in-law’s birthday party. After a fight with her husband ending with him asking her to leave, Liz drives a tractor and drives it over the party tables. Everyone runs to the tractor trying to get Liz off, her daughter stands in front and pleads with Liz to stop. Liz veers the tractor to miss hitting her daughter but ends up hitting her mother-in-law by accident. The filming location for Liz’s house was at Point Cook Homestead, 1 Point Cook Homestead Rd, Point Cook.

On this day …….. 11th May 1813

When the First Fleet arrived in New South Wales in 1788, all efforts concentrated on developing farmland and a food supply to support the convict colony. Free settlers also began to arrive, lured by the promise of a better life in the new, young country. This placed considerable strain on New South Wales’s resources, and farmers began to see the need for expansion beyond the Blue Mountains, which had provided an impassable barrier to the west. Many attempts were made to find a path through the Blue Mountains, but their attempts had all focused on following the rivers, which invariably ended up against sheer cliff faces or mazes of impassable gorges. Gregory Blaxland was a wealthy grazier who had come to Australia in 1806. He stood to gain much by finding a route to new grasslands. Blaxland approached Governor Macquarie about funding an expedition to cross the Blue Mountains. Though Macquarie found Blaxland to be troublesome and discontented, and felt he should be growing grain to feed the colony, he granted approval for the expedition. Blaxland took along two other men: William Lawson, who had arrived in Sydney as an ensign with the New South Wales Corps in 1800, and was a landholder and magistrate with surveying experience; and William Wentworth, the first Australian-born explorer, being the son of a convict mother and an Irish father, a surgeon who had been convicted of highway robbery. Wentworth was to become one of the leading figures of early colonial New South Wales. Lawson, Blaxland and Wentworth departed South Creek, Sydney Cove, on the 11th of May 1813 with four servants, five dogs and four horses. The route they traversed is essentially still the one used by travellers today. On 31 May they reached Mount Blaxland from where they could see the plains to the west. Beyond the mountains the explorers found a great expanse of open country, which they surveyed. Their exploration was significant for opening up the grazing lands of inland New South Wales.

Wentworth

Will Joan Ferguson (“The Freak”) become Top Dog of Wentworth Correctional Centre tomorrow night, or will Allie Novak take revenge for the death of Bea Smith?

Joan Ferguson’s house in Collingwood

Wentworth
Will Franky Doyle escape from Wentworth Correctional Centre this week? Will she head back to Mike Pennisi’s home to look for evidence? Is Franky innocent?
Mike Pennisi’s house in Williamstown.

Fishermen discovered the body of Ali Riza Sonmez, 44, in the Darling River near Wentworth, on the NSW-Victorian border, on Australia Day in 1986. Police said there was no evidence Mr Sonmez had any underworld links. The father-of-four, a disabled pensioner from Mildura, had been shot above each eye and in the back of the head, as well as to his body. Police said Mr Sonmez left his family home in Mildura about 5pm on January 23, 1986, and was seen walking along the footpath of Ninth Street, past the Mobil service station and towards Deakin Avenue. About 6.30pm that day, another witness saw Mr Sonmez arguing with a man, who was in the company of two women, outside the post office on Commercial Street in Merbein. Photo of Ali Riza Sonmez

 

On this day …….. 9th September 1949

The “Murray bunyip” has been sighted again. Mr. Brian Blake, of St. Kilda,
who is visiting a relative in Wentworth, South West New South Wales, said he had seen the creature swimming in the Darling River, at the rear of the district hospital. He described it as being about 3ft. long with a thick neck and a strange-looking head. “I first saw it at night,” he said. “At first it looked like a dog with a shiny coat and long, drooping ears. “It dived under the water and stayed there for a long time. It made a noise like, a loud grunt.” The creature, “was also seen in the same place a couple of days later. Other people who saw it were Mr. Blake’s mother and two other women. Expert opinion is that the strange animal recently seen was a seal escaped from circus.

 

60 years of Australian TV

Wentworth is an Australian television drama series. It was first broadcast on SoHo on 1 May 2013. The series serves as a contemporary reimagining of Prisoner, which ran on Network Ten from 1979 to 1986. Lara Radulovich and David Hannam developed Wentworth from Reg Watson’s original concept. The series is set in the modern day and begins with Bea Smith (Danielle Cormack)’s early days in prison. One of the main characters is Liz Birdsworth. Liz Birdsworth is sentenced to 11 years for Manslaughter, dangerous driving causing death, and driving under the influence. Liz drank a whole bottle of vodka due to stress of organising her mother-in-law’s birthday party. After a fight with her husband ending with him asking her to leave, Liz drives a tractor and drives it over the party tables. Everyone runs to the tractor trying to get Liz off, her daughter stands in front and pleads with Liz to stop. Liz veers the tractor to miss hitting her daughter but ends up hitting her mother-in-law by accident. The filming location for Liz’s house was at Point Cook Homestead, 1 Point Cook Homestead Rd, Point Cook.

On this day …….. 11th May 1813

When the First Fleet arrived in New South Wales in 1788, all efforts concentrated on developing farmland and a food supply to support the convict colony. Free settlers also began to arrive, lured by the promise of a better life in the new, young country. This placed considerable strain on New South Wales’s resources, and farmers began to see the need for expansion beyond the Blue Mountains, which had provided an impassable barrier to the west. Many attempts were made to find a path through the Blue Mountains, but their attempts had all focused on following the rivers, which invariably ended up against sheer cliff faces or mazes of impassable gorges. Gregory Blaxland was a wealthy grazier who had come to Australia in 1806. He stood to gain much by finding a route to new grasslands. Blaxland approached Governor Macquarie about funding an expedition to cross the Blue Mountains. Though Macquarie found Blaxland to be troublesome and discontented, and felt he should be growing grain to feed the colony, he granted approval for the expedition. Blaxland took along two other men: William Lawson, who had arrived in Sydney as an ensign with the New South Wales Corps in 1800, and was a landholder and magistrate with surveying experience; and William Wentworth, the first Australian-born explorer, being the son of a convict mother and an Irish father, a surgeon who had been convicted of highway robbery. Wentworth was to become one of the leading figures of early colonial New South Wales. Lawson, Blaxland and Wentworth departed South Creek, Sydney Cove, on the 11th of May 1813 with four servants, five dogs and four horses. The route they traversed is essentially still the one used by travellers today. On 31 May they reached Mount Blaxland from where they could see the plains to the west. Beyond the mountains the explorers found a great expanse of open country, which they surveyed. Their exploration was significant for opening up the grazing lands of inland New South Wales.

Fishermen discovered the body of Ali Riza Sonmez, 44, in the Darling River near Wentworth, on the NSW-Victorian border, on Australia Day in 1986. Police said there was no evidence Mr Sonmez had any underworld links. The father-of-four, a disabled pensioner from Mildura, had been shot above each eye and in the back of the head, as well as to his body. Police said Mr Sonmez left his family home in Mildura about 5pm on January 23, 1986, and was seen walking along the footpath of Ninth Street, past the Mobil service station and towards Deakin Avenue. About 6.30pm that day, another witness saw Mr Sonmez arguing with a man, who was in the company of two women, outside the post office on Commercial Street in Merbein. Photo of Ali Riza Sonmez