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On This Day – April 21, 1926

Falling out of bed on April 21, Clarissa Miles, 60, of Roslyn street, West Melbourne, received injuries from which she died six days later. At the inquest today tho Coroner (Mr D. Berrman) found that death was accidental.

Henry John Edward Jones, engineer, Macquarie street. Prahran. said he saw his aunt in the Melbourne Hospital on April 26. and she told him she was turning over in bed when she fell out. She was a big woman 15 or 16 stone in weight.

MURDERED ON THIS DAY ……….. 14th October 1915

Maria Black aged 29 was charged at the City Court with having murdered Mabel Weston aged 45 at West Melbourne on the 14th of October 1915. It was alleged that Black went to a house in Capel-street, West Melbourne, occupied by Mrs. Mabel Weston, and her family. Black entered the house at the back, when Mrs. Weston, her family and a Spanish lodger named Valdo Pinsack were at dinner. Black opened the kitchen door, and fired at Mrs. Weston, who fell from her chair to the floor. Pinsack seized Black’s hand and while he held her she fired again. When she was arrested Black said she had known the Weston for three years. They had lived next door to one another. Pinsack became infatuated with her, and although she did not return his affection she pretended she was in love with him. Mrs. Weston, however, came between them, and did all she could to keep them apart. She (Black) had received letters in a filthy condition, which she said had been sent at the instigation of Mrs. Weston. Black added that she found in a drawer at her home a revolver that had belonged to a man who had gone to the front. She took the revolver to Weston’s house, so as to frighten her. After entering the Weston’s kitchen her mind was a blank ‘until she was conscious of Pinsack taking the revolver from her.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – April 26, 1948

MELBOURNE

A Greek fishmonger who was alleged to have stab bed his employee on April 26, died in the Pentridge Gaol hospital on Sunday, it was stated in North Melbourne. John Athenis, 59 year old fishmonger of West Melbourne, had been charged with having wounded Stanley Banos, his employee, with intent to murder him. Banos was still in the Royal Melbourne Hospital recovering from wounds, it was stated. The charge against the dead man was withdrawn.

 

ON THIS DAY – February 2, 1923

A nude decomposed and decapitated body of a young woman in a bag in the River Yarra, was found on this day in 1923. The body was recovered by Detective McGuffie and two constables after they had dragged the river for three hours. A communication was received at police headquarters that two men had been seen at 11pm driving onto the Anderson-Street bridge. A witness Mr. Harold Montrose Sharkey Lloyd, of West Melbourne, told the police that he was about to cross the bridge at 11pm when he saw two men drive up in a motor car and stop suddenly near the kerbstone close to the bridge on the south side of the Yarra. The rear light of the car was obscured by a piece of cloth or bag and the headlights were dimmed. Soon after the car stopped two figures. Mr. Sharkey Lloyd says, emerged from the shadows of the bridge carrying a heavy object. The engine of the motor car was running at high speed. Mr. Sharkey Lloyd saw in the actions of the men something ominous and walked back to the end of the bridge where he hid himself in the darkness. Soon afterwards he saw the men lift what he thought was a coffin, to the railings of the bridge, they looked round to see that no one was watching and then threw the object into the river. There was a loud splash as the object struck the water. Immediately afterwards the men walked hurriedly off the bridge and jumping into the car drove off rapidly towards Richmond. Mr. Sharkey Boyd suspected that the men had committed a murder and had disposed of the body by throwing it into the river. He ran along the road and communicated with the criminal investigation department. After three unsuccessful attempts to bring this object to the surface he recovered a heavy bag which was taken to the river bank and opened. Spectators who had gathered were horrified at the discovery, that it contained the decomposed body of a woman, thought to be aged from 15 to 18 years. The body had been decapitated and the head was found inside another bag. The dead woman’s hair appeared to be auburn or dark brown and was plaited. In the bag were also about a hundredweight of blue stone, used as a sinker. The state of the body indicated that death had taken place some months previous. From evidence obtained it was determined the body was that of Bertha Coghlan who was buried shortly after her death, and that fearing discovery of the crime its perpetrators had it brought to the city and thrown into the Yarra.

 

 

MURDERED ON THIS DAY ……….. 14th October 1915

Maria Black aged 29 was charged at the City Court with having murdered Mabel Weston aged 45 at West Melbourne on the 14th of October 1915. It was alleged that Black went to a house in Capel-street, West Melbourne, occupied by Mrs. Mabel Weston, and her family. Black entered the house at the back, when Mrs. Weston, her family and a Spanish lodger named Valdo Pinsack were at dinner. Black opened the kitchen door, and fired at Mrs. Weston, who fell from her chair to the floor. Pinsack seized Black’s hand and while he held her she fired again. When she was arrested Black said she had known the Weston for three years. They had lived next door to one another. Pinsack became infatuated with her, and although she did not return his affection she pretended she was in love with him. Mrs. Weston, however, came between them, and did all she could to keep them apart. She (Black) had received letters in a filthy condition, which she said had been sent at the instigation of Mrs. Weston. Black added that she found in a drawer at her home a revolver that had belonged to a man who had gone to the front. She took the revolver to Weston’s house, so as to frighten her. After entering the Weston’s kitchen her mind was a blank ‘until she was conscious of Pinsack taking the revolver from her.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – April 26, 1948

MELBOURNE

A Greek fishmonger who was alleged to have stab bed his employee on April 26, died in the Pentridge Gaol hospital on Sunday, it was stated in North Melbourne. John Athenis, 59 year old fishmonger of West Melbourne, had been charged with having wounded Stanley Banos, his employee, with intent to murder him. Banos was still in the Royal Melbourne Hospital recovering from wounds, it was stated. The charge against the dead man was withdrawn.

 

ON THIS DAY – February 2, 1923

A nude decomposed and decapitated body of a young woman in a bag in the River Yarra, was found on this day in 1923. The body was recovered by Detective McGuffie and two constables after they had dragged the river for three hours. A communication was received at police headquarters that two men had been seen at 11pm driving onto the Anderson-Street bridge. A witness Mr. Harold Montrose Sharkey Lloyd, of West Melbourne, told the police that he was about to cross the bridge at 11pm when he saw two men drive up in a motor car and stop suddenly near the kerbstone close to the bridge on the south side of the Yarra. The rear light of the car was obscured by a piece of cloth or bag and the headlights were dimmed. Soon after the car stopped two figures. Mr. Sharkey Lloyd says, emerged from the shadows of the bridge carrying a heavy object. The engine of the motor car was running at high speed. Mr. Sharkey Lloyd saw in the actions of the men something ominous and walked back to the end of the bridge where he hid himself in the darkness. Soon afterwards he saw the men lift what he thought was a coffin, to the railings of the bridge, they looked round to see that no one was watching and then threw the object into the river. There was a loud splash as the object struck the water. Immediately afterwards the men walked hurriedly off the bridge and jumping into the car drove off rapidly towards Richmond. Mr. Sharkey Boyd suspected that the men had committed a murder and had disposed of the body by throwing it into the river. He ran along the road and communicated with the criminal investigation department. After three unsuccessful attempts to bring this object to the surface he recovered a heavy bag which was taken to the river bank and opened. Spectators who had gathered were horrified at the discovery, that it contained the decomposed body of a woman, thought to be aged from 15 to 18 years. The body had been decapitated and the head was found inside another bag. The dead woman’s hair appeared to be auburn or dark brown and was plaited. In the bag were also about a hundredweight of blue stone, used as a sinker. The state of the body indicated that death had taken place some months previous. From evidence obtained it was determined the body was that of Bertha Coghlan who was buried shortly after her death, and that fearing discovery of the crime its perpetrators had it brought to the city and thrown into the Yarra.