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On This Day – July 23, 1950

Allegations that Raymond Murray Baillie, 43, military pensioner, killed his wife and wounded his two sons with a rifle on July 23 last were made in the Criminal Court yesterday.

Baillie, of Nicholson-street, North Fitzroy, pleaded not guilty to the murder of his wife, Laurel, Frances Baillie. Outlining the case for the Crown before the Chief Justice (Sir Edmund Herring) and a jury, Mr. F. Nelson said Baillie had determined to resolve his domestic difficulties by ending the lives of his wife and sons, and then, ending his own life.  This determination was not fulfilled, because he was disarmed by his sons.  Mr. Nelson said there had apparently been domestic difficulties between Baillie and his wife and sons, aged 17 and 20 years, for some time before July 23. On the night in question the mother and sons decided to leave him and were packing suitcases, when Baillie got a rifle and shot his wife in their bedroom. He levelled the rifle at his two sons, one of whom was shot in the shoulder, and the other in the chest.

“We’re Leaving”

In a statement alleged to have been made to the police, Mr. Nelson said Baillie said his sons and wife started to abuse him, and his wife said to the boys; “Come on. Pack up, boys; we’re leaving.” In the alleged statement Baillie said he picked up a loaded rifle. He did not take aim, but pulled the trigger and the gun went off. He said his wife fell on the floor, and he went out to shoot himself. He realised the boys were going to attack him, so he fired three or four shots. The boys took the rifle from him and prevented him from carrying out his intention to shoot himself. Vance Baillie, who was wounded in the shoulder, said he was wakened by an argument between his mother and father, and went to his father’s bedroom after the argument quietened. He said his mother pushed his father through a window. After some discussion with his mother and brother they decided to pack and leave the home. Shortly afterwards he heard a shot and a groan. He and his brother rushed along the passage. There was a shot, and his brother fell.

Hit in Shoulder

Vance Baillie said he jumped for the kitchen door, and a shot hit him in the shoulder. Cross-examined by Mr. R. V. Monahan, K.C., for the father, Vance Baillie said, as far as he could remember, he had only “belted” his father once. About 18 months ago, he said, he got a Judo hold on his father and tossed him over his head on to a brick wall. The incident had followed a fight between his father and grandfather. He agreed with Mr. Monahan that at one time he had said he would kill his father. The hearing will be continued today.Mr. Mr. F. Nelson appeared for the Crown. . Mr. R. V. Monahan. K.C.. with Mr. J. P. Moloney (Instructed Dy Mr. R. Dunn), appeared for Baillie.

On This Day – April 11, 1892

At Shepparton Assizes to-day, before the Chief Justice, John Molunphy was charged with the murder of his son in law, Thomas Meaney. On April 11 deceased was quarrelling with his wife and ill-treating her, when hearing his daughter’s cries for help the prisoner ran into the room and cut Meaney’s throat. He then went to the police station and gave himself up. His Honor summed up in favour of a verdict of manslaughter and the Jury returned that verdict. Prisoner was remanded for sentence.

ON THIS DAY – April 7, 1912

CARLTON

Jason O’Mahoney was charged at the Criminal Court, with manslaughter of his wife, Catherine, at Carlton, on April 7. It was alleged by the Crown that O’ Mahoney had knocked his wife down and had caused the injuries which resulted in her death. O’Mahoney denied that he had kicked his wife. The injury which caused her death was brought about by her having fallen over the bedstead. The jury returned a verdict of not guilty, and O’Mahoney was discharged.

 

ON THIS DAY – October 8, 1942

George Frederick Wellington Maes, 35, a member of the CMF, pleaded not guilty in the Bendigo Supreme Court yesterday to a charge of having murdered his wife, Olive Freda Maes, 20, and their 10-month-old son, at Boort, on October 8.

Maes, in evidence, said his wife used to nag him. She often had  said that if she did not have the baby she would go to dances while he was on duty. On October 8 he saw her hitting the child about the head with a waddy. He tried to stop her, but she ran out of the room. He followed and she swung the waddy at him. He picked up a pea rifle and, without taking aim, pulled the trigger. She fell and he dragged her into another room. When he saw her eyes move he reloaded the rifle and fired another shot into her forehead as he did not want her to be in agony. He did not kill the child.

The case was adjourned.

 

 

On This Day – July 23, 1950

Allegations that Raymond Murray Baillie, 43, military pensioner, killed his wife and wounded his two sons with a rifle on July 23 last were made in the Criminal Court yesterday.

Baillie, of Nicholson-street, North Fitzroy, pleaded not guilty to the murder of his wife, Laurel, Frances Baillie. Outlining the case for the Crown before the Chief Justice (Sir Edmund Herring) and a jury, Mr. F. Nelson said Baillie had determined to resolve his domestic difficulties by ending the lives of his wife and sons, and then, ending his own life.  This determination was not fulfilled, because he was disarmed by his sons.  Mr. Nelson said there had apparently been domestic difficulties between Baillie and his wife and sons, aged 17 and 20 years, for some time before July 23. On the night in question the mother and sons decided to leave him and were packing suitcases, when Baillie got a rifle and shot his wife in their bedroom. He levelled the rifle at his two sons, one of whom was shot in the shoulder, and the other in the chest.

“We’re Leaving”

In a statement alleged to have been made to the police, Mr. Nelson said Baillie said his sons and wife started to abuse him, and his wife said to the boys; “Come on. Pack up, boys; we’re leaving.” In the alleged statement Baillie said he picked up a loaded rifle. He did not take aim, but pulled the trigger and the gun went off. He said his wife fell on the floor, and he went out to shoot himself. He realised the boys were going to attack him, so he fired three or four shots. The boys took the rifle from him and prevented him from carrying out his intention to shoot himself. Vance Baillie, who was wounded in the shoulder, said he was wakened by an argument between his mother and father, and went to his father’s bedroom after the argument quietened. He said his mother pushed his father through a window. After some discussion with his mother and brother they decided to pack and leave the home. Shortly afterwards he heard a shot and a groan. He and his brother rushed along the passage. There was a shot, and his brother fell.

Hit in Shoulder

Vance Baillie said he jumped for the kitchen door, and a shot hit him in the shoulder. Cross-examined by Mr. R. V. Monahan, K.C., for the father, Vance Baillie said, as far as he could remember, he had only “belted” his father once. About 18 months ago, he said, he got a Judo hold on his father and tossed him over his head on to a brick wall. The incident had followed a fight between his father and grandfather. He agreed with Mr. Monahan that at one time he had said he would kill his father. The hearing will be continued today.Mr. Mr. F. Nelson appeared for the Crown. . Mr. R. V. Monahan. K.C.. with Mr. J. P. Moloney (Instructed Dy Mr. R. Dunn), appeared for Baillie.

On This Day – April 11, 1892

At Shepparton Assizes to-day, before the Chief Justice, John Molunphy was charged with the murder of his son in law, Thomas Meaney. On April 11 deceased was quarrelling with his wife and ill-treating her, when hearing his daughter’s cries for help the prisoner ran into the room and cut Meaney’s throat. He then went to the police station and gave himself up. His Honor summed up in favour of a verdict of manslaughter and the Jury returned that verdict. Prisoner was remanded for sentence.

ON THIS DAY – April 7, 1912

CARLTON

Jason O’Mahoney was charged at the Criminal Court, with manslaughter of his wife, Catherine, at Carlton, on April 7. It was alleged by the Crown that O’ Mahoney had knocked his wife down and had caused the injuries which resulted in her death. O’Mahoney denied that he had kicked his wife. The injury which caused her death was brought about by her having fallen over the bedstead. The jury returned a verdict of not guilty, and O’Mahoney was discharged.

 

ON THIS DAY – March 6, 1893

MANTON ACQUITTED

The trial of John Alexander Manton for the murder of his wife at Albert Park on the 6th of March was held at the city court. The case for the Crown closed without any fresh facts being elicited. Mr. J. T. Smith opened the case for the defence, and asked that the evidence given by the accused at the coroner’s inquest might be put in. His Honor refused the application, and the Crown declined to put in the document. Manton was then called, and gave evidence similar to that given at the inquest. In cross-examination he said his wife was very nervous, and would tremble at any slight shock. His wife told him that she did not agree with any member of her family, and this was his reason for not making their acquaintance. His wife’s reason for insuring her life was fear about the state of her heart, and she also said she would like to have a policy to show her friends. Mr. Smith addressed the jury, and submitted that no proof of foul play had been produced by the Crown. He scouted the idea of murder upon the ground of human sympathy, and asked what man could the jury conceive of who, when confronted with his victim on the island, would have dared to take her body on his knee and hold her there for an hour in the cold night-time. His Honor having summed up the evidence the jury after a retirement of 20 minutes returned with a verdict of acquittal.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – October 8, 1942

George Frederick Wellington Maes, 35, a member of the CMF, pleaded not guilty in the Bendigo Supreme Court yesterday to a charge of having murdered his wife, Olive Freda Maes, 20, and their 10-month-old son, at Boort, on October 8.

Maes, in evidence, said his wife used to nag him. She often had  said that if she did not have the baby she would go to dances while he was on duty. On October 8 he saw her hitting the child about the head with a waddy. He tried to stop her, but she ran out of the room. He followed and she swung the waddy at him. He picked up a pea rifle and, without taking aim, pulled the trigger. She fell and he dragged her into another room. When he saw her eyes move he reloaded the rifle and fired another shot into her forehead as he did not want her to be in agony. He did not kill the child.

The case was adjourned.

 

 

On This Day – July 23, 1950

Allegations that Raymond Murray Baillie, 43, military pensioner, killed his wife and wounded his two sons with a rifle on July 23 last were made in the Criminal Court yesterday.

Baillie, of Nicholson-street, North Fitzroy, pleaded not guilty to the murder of his wife, Laurel, Frances Baillie. Outlining the case for the Crown before the Chief Justice (Sir Edmund Herring) and a jury, Mr. F. Nelson said Baillie had determined to resolve his domestic difficulties by ending the lives of his wife and sons, and then, ending his own life.  This determination was not fulfilled, because he was disarmed by his sons.  Mr. Nelson said there had apparently been domestic difficulties between Baillie and his wife and sons, aged 17 and 20 years, for some time before July 23. On the night in question the mother and sons decided to leave him and were packing suitcases, when Baillie got a rifle and shot his wife in their bedroom. He levelled the rifle at his two sons, one of whom was shot in the shoulder, and the other in the chest.

“We’re Leaving”

In a statement alleged to have been made to the police, Mr. Nelson said Baillie said his sons and wife started to abuse him, and his wife said to the boys; “Come on. Pack up, boys; we’re leaving.” In the alleged statement Baillie said he picked up a loaded rifle. He did not take aim, but pulled the trigger and the gun went off. He said his wife fell on the floor, and he went out to shoot himself. He realised the boys were going to attack him, so he fired three or four shots. The boys took the rifle from him and prevented him from carrying out his intention to shoot himself. Vance Baillie, who was wounded in the shoulder, said he was wakened by an argument between his mother and father, and went to his father’s bedroom after the argument quietened. He said his mother pushed his father through a window. After some discussion with his mother and brother they decided to pack and leave the home. Shortly afterwards he heard a shot and a groan. He and his brother rushed along the passage. There was a shot, and his brother fell.

Hit in Shoulder

Vance Baillie said he jumped for the kitchen door, and a shot hit him in the shoulder. Cross-examined by Mr. R. V. Monahan, K.C., for the father, Vance Baillie said, as far as he could remember, he had only “belted” his father once. About 18 months ago, he said, he got a Judo hold on his father and tossed him over his head on to a brick wall. The incident had followed a fight between his father and grandfather. He agreed with Mr. Monahan that at one time he had said he would kill his father. The hearing will be continued today.Mr. Mr. F. Nelson appeared for the Crown. . Mr. R. V. Monahan. K.C.. with Mr. J. P. Moloney (Instructed Dy Mr. R. Dunn), appeared for Baillie.

On This Day – April 11, 1892

At Shepparton Assizes to-day, before the Chief Justice, John Molunphy was charged with the murder of his son in law, Thomas Meaney. On April 11 deceased was quarrelling with his wife and ill-treating her, when hearing his daughter’s cries for help the prisoner ran into the room and cut Meaney’s throat. He then went to the police station and gave himself up. His Honor summed up in favour of a verdict of manslaughter and the Jury returned that verdict. Prisoner was remanded for sentence.

ON THIS DAY – April 7, 1912

CARLTON

Jason O’Mahoney was charged at the Criminal Court, with manslaughter of his wife, Catherine, at Carlton, on April 7. It was alleged by the Crown that O’ Mahoney had knocked his wife down and had caused the injuries which resulted in her death. O’Mahoney denied that he had kicked his wife. The injury which caused her death was brought about by her having fallen over the bedstead. The jury returned a verdict of not guilty, and O’Mahoney was discharged.