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Blue Heelers is an Australian police drama series.  Produced by Southern Star Group and ran for 12 years on the Seven Network, from 1994 to 2006.

The series depicted the everyday lives and relationships of the residents of Mt Thomas (Williamstown), a fictional town in Victoria. The opening title sequence was filmed at Castlemaine, Victoria. 

The series focuses on the daily lives of police officers working at a police station in the fictional town of Mount Thomas.

Each episode is presented from the perspective of the officers.

On average, 42 episodes of Blue Heelers were broadcast per year on Australian television, with each episode comprising fifty scenes. One episode was made every week.

The scripts were written to a formula which allowed one day for rehearsal, two days on location and two days in the studio.  Episodes were shot eight to ten weeks ahead of their scheduled broadcast date.

Apart from the regular cast members, the show employed 4,300 guest actors annually, plus 30 extras every week. A total of 150 people were involved in the show’s production each week, including cast members, crew, wardrobe, publicists and writers.

Blue Heelers is regarded as one of the most successful programmes on Australian television.  Winning many awards, including 25 Logie Awards.  Blue Heelers was voted 37th greatest show on Australian television in the 50 Years 50 Show poll in 2005.

visit www.twistedhistory.net.au

10TH ESCAPE FAILS

On This Day ….. 24th July 1954

A 16 year old “Houdini” managed to escape from Aradale Mental Hospital, on 24th of July 1954, by scaling a 20ft wall. This was his 10th time he has escaped from mental and other institutions in the last three years. The boy, who travelled 128 miles, was caught by police on the 28th of July, after a wild chase around Williamstown. When police went to the youth’s home in Fifth ave, Williamstown, just after 7am, he leapt from a side window and bolted toward the rear of the house. A hectic 30 minute chase followed, with the youth scrambling over fences, through barbed wire, a poultry pen, and dozens of other obstacles. Eventually at 8:30am Constables M. Keetley and E. Hancock trapped him in a backyard of a house after he had tried desperately to open a locked door. Exhausted, bleeding and covered in grime, he was taken to the City Watch house were he was charged with house breaking and stealing, he was taken to Pentridge Gaol.

 

ON THIS DAY – June 20, 1907

WILLIAMSTOWN

Charlotte Kenny was on trial charged with murdering her infant by poison at Williamstown on June 20. The defence was that her mind was un-hinged at the time owing to being prosecuted for an attempt to pass certain valueless cheques. The case is proceeding. Kenny received two month gaol.

 

ON THIS DAY – June 17, 1881

A young man named William Bristow, aged 23, – a resident of Williamstown, met with a frightful death at the steam stone-crushing works, Williamstown Junction, at half -past 2 o’clock on Friday afternoon. The deceased was engaged to break the larger stones ready for the crusher, which was fed by a lad named Murray. Murray left the machine for a few minutes to get a drink at the water-tap, and on coming back saw the deceased in the act of putting a stone in the iron jaws, when he suddenly disappeared. He fell head foremost into the fly-wheel of the crusher, and was instantly crushed to death, The head, when liberated, was hanging from the body; one arm was found about 12ft. away. The deceased had been suffering from a weak knee, which he had injured some time previously, and it is conjectured that in leaning forward his injured knee caused him to slip, and he fell into the wheel as stated

ON THIS DAY – November 4, 1943

That John Joseph Brown, 29, labourer, of Nelson-pl., Williamstown, had led, his mother “an awful life” and threatened to murder her was stated at the inquiry held by Mr. Tingate, city coroner, on Wednesday, to determine the circumstances in which Brown was fatally shot on November 4, allegedly by his young brother, Frank William Brown, 14 years old. Mr. Tingate recorded a finding that he had met his death from gunshot wounds inflicted by Frank Brown. Bail was fixed at £300, with a like surety. Mrs. Teresa Victoria Brown said that she had been repeatedly abused by her son John, who also had threatened to kill her. With her children she had to have meals at a neighbour’s home because they could not get peace when her son John was at home. To Mr. Goldberg, who appeared for Frank Brown, Mrs. Brown said that John had led her an awful life. His conduct had almost reduced her to a nervous wreck. John had been a “lone wolf” he never had friends because of his disposition, which was surly and disagreeable. He always seemed to have a look of villainy in his eyes. Mrs. Mary Adelaide Gilbert, of Ann-st., Williamstown, said that Mrs. Brown and some of her children had meals at her home, because they could not withstand the abuse of John Brown. At 6.40p.m., on November 4 Frankie left her home after tea, and returned about 10 minutes later and said: “I’ve shot Jackie’. Frankie also told witness that he had taken the gun from her home through a window, and, when asked why he had shot Jackie, he said: “Mum will be all right now.” To Mr. Goldberg, Mrs. Gilbert said that she had known John Brown for about six years, and, he could not be described as anything else but a beast.

 

 

 

ON THIS DAY…… 23rd September 1863

An inquest upon the skeleton of a child, found concealed in the roof of the Rainbow Hotel, Swanston-street, Williamstown on the 23rd of September 1863, before Dr. Youl, the city coroner, at the police station, in Russell-street.  On the 8th of September 1863 during some repairs to the roof of the hotel a bundle containing the remains was found by a slater, concealed between the roof of the house and the ceiling of the room beneath; that this place had been used as a kind of lumber-room, and was accessible from the staircase of the house.  The bundle could not have been deposited from the outside except by cutting through the roof, and that there was nothing in the remains to indicate the sex of the deceased, or the cause of death. The inquest was then adjourned for further inquiries. The most indefatigable researches have been in the meantime made by the detective police into this mysterious affair, and from their minute, and at the same time extensive, investigations, the particulars detailed in the following evidence have been arrived at. Mr. J. M. Smith attended at the inquest to watch the proceedings on behalf of Mr. Cooper, the late landlord of the Rainbow Hotel.   It was not known who murdered the child or who hid the remains but it was believed to have happened in the 1850s.

 

 

On This Day – 13th of August 1907

Charlotte Kenny, a young married woman, was charged with having murdered her infant child, Jeremiah Kenny, by the administration of poison. The case for the prosecution was that the accused lived in Swanston street, North Williamstown, with her husband. On June 20 she administered a dose of lysol to her child, and also attempted to take some contents of the bottle herself. Medical aid was at once called in, but the child died the following day.

10TH ESCAPE FAILS

On This Day ….. 24th July 1954

A 16 year old “Houdini” managed to escape from Aradale Mental Hospital, on 24th of July 1954, by scaling a 20ft wall. This was his 10th time he has escaped from mental and other institutions in the last three years. The boy, who travelled 128 miles, was caught by police on the 28th of July, after a wild chase around Williamstown. When police went to the youth’s home in Fifth ave, Williamstown, just after 7am, he leapt from a side window and bolted toward the rear of the house. A hectic 30 minute chase followed, with the youth scrambling over fences, through barbed wire, a poultry pen, and dozens of other obstacles. Eventually at 8:30am Constables M. Keetley and E. Hancock trapped him in a backyard of a house after he had tried desperately to open a locked door. Exhausted, bleeding and covered in grime, he was taken to the City Watch house were he was charged with house breaking and stealing, he was taken to Pentridge Gaol.

 

ON THIS DAY – June 20, 1907

WILLIAMSTOWN

Charlotte Kenny was on trial charged with murdering her infant by poison at Williamstown on June 20. The defence was that her mind was un-hinged at the time owing to being prosecuted for an attempt to pass certain valueless cheques. The case is proceeding. Kenny received two month gaol.

 

ON THIS DAY – June 17, 1881

A young man named William Bristow, aged 23, – a resident of Williamstown, met with a frightful death at the steam stone-crushing works, Williamstown Junction, at half -past 2 o’clock on Friday afternoon. The deceased was engaged to break the larger stones ready for the crusher, which was fed by a lad named Murray. Murray left the machine for a few minutes to get a drink at the water-tap, and on coming back saw the deceased in the act of putting a stone in the iron jaws, when he suddenly disappeared. He fell head foremost into the fly-wheel of the crusher, and was instantly crushed to death, The head, when liberated, was hanging from the body; one arm was found about 12ft. away. The deceased had been suffering from a weak knee, which he had injured some time previously, and it is conjectured that in leaning forward his injured knee caused him to slip, and he fell into the wheel as stated

Blue Heelers is an Australian police drama series that ran for 12 years, from 1994 to 2006, and depicts the lives of police officers in Mount Thomas, a fictional small town in Victoria, which was located in Williamstown. Maggie Doyle is a fictional character portrayed by Lisa McCune in the long-running Australian police show Blue Heelers. She first appeared in 1994, and exited in 2000. Maggie arrived in Mount Thomas in the debut episode ‘A Woman’s Place’. She was driving into town and was pulled over by P.J. (Martin Sacks) and Nick (William McInnes). P.J. gave her a breathalyser test and realised she was a cop. She then went on to the Imperial Hotel, where she was staying, and finds out that Wayne Patterson (an old love of hers) was living and working in Mount Thomas. She then goes to the police station and introduced herself to Sergeant Tom Croydon. (It was shown that Tom and Maggie’s father, Pat Doyle had also once been posted at the same station.) This episode saw Maggie trying to convince a girl who had been raped to press charges. She also shoots Mick Doherty’s dog as it was going to attack and kill Wayne. The debut episode of the series showed us Maggie’s good nature and how opposed she is to sexism. Prior to her arrival in Mount Thomas, all of the police officers were men, and the town seemed to find the idea of a female police officer funny. This changed, of course, over the course of the series as more female officers were posted to Mount Thomas.She is the fourth longest character behind Tom,Chris and PJ. Cont Maggie Doyle House was filmed at 19 Verdon St, Williamstown

On This Day ……. 21st May 1905

Mrs. Ann Mullen died at Williamstown, Melbourne Victoria on this day in 1905, at the great age of 107 years and 2 months. Mullen was born in 1803.