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Frederick Bayley Deeming was one of 14 children born to Thomas and Ann Deeming in Leicestershire, England.

Frederick would first get into trouble with the law aged just 15 years old  for throwing rocks at a train.  At 16 he ranaway to see and began his life of crime with stealing and obtaining money by deception – something which would be a common thread for the rest of his life.

The beginning of the end for Deeming began with the discovery of Emily Lydia Mather’s decomposing body buried beneath the hearth of the second bedroom at 57 Andrew Street, Windsor on March 3, 1892.

Emily had married Deeming, who was know as Albert Williams in Rainhill, Lancashire in 1891 before the young couple set out for Australia.  They arrived in Melbourne in November 1891 and stayed for a short time in the city of Melbourne before heading to the rented property in Windsor.  Emily was not to know that this house would become her coffin!

On Christmas Eve, Deeming murdered Emily and in a well prepared plan buried her remains within the house before heading back to Melbourne.  He had paid up the rent for a couple of months so it wasnt until a new prospective tennant inspected the property that Emily’s remains were discovered.

By this time, Deeming had headed to Sydney and enticed Kate Rounsfell to marry him and move to WA with him.  Luckily for her Deeming left first and Kate only made it as far as Melbourne before news broke of her fiancee’s evil deeds.

But Emily was not the first murder Deeming had committed.  During the investigation into the death of Emily, it came to light that Deeming had been married before and had 4 children.  Marie and the children were found murdered and cemented under the kitchen floor at the property Deeming had rented in Rainhill.

Deeming was finally caught out by clever detective work and his boasting of his accomplishments.

Deeming was sentenced to death and was executed on May 29, 1892 at the Old Melbourne Gaol.

Before his death, a telegram was sent from London, requesting that Deeming be interviewed over the Whitechapel murders of 1888.  It would join numerous requests from police forces around the world asking if he could have been responsible for as many as 18 murders.

 

ON THIS DAY – July 26, 1933

 

At the inquest into the death of Katherine Dorman, 24, machinist, on July 26, following an attack and injuries inflicted with an iron pipe while in her bedroom at Windsor the Coroner found John Boles murdered her and ordered a warrant for his arrest after hearing the evidence of Miss Dorman’s land-lady, Mrs. Nellie Burke, that Boles had repeatedly hit Dorman over the head with the pipe. Boles, who is a married man left a letter saying that he had lost his employment, which meant his means for getting a divorce had gone. This seemed to unhinge his overstrung nerves and then he simply wanted to die and take the dear girl with him.

ON THIS DAY – July 19, 1947

Melbourne Gangster James Coates who scammed £40,000 from an Australian grazier, £19,000 from an Austrian nobleman, £15,000 from the son of the Sweden’s King, and from an Indian prince, he stole £80,000 was murdered.

The weeks before Coates murder he had received anonymous phone calls, first calling him Constable Coates, second an ambulance was called to his apartment saying a man had been shoot and third a hearse had been called to collect Coates body.

Coates body was found in a vacant allotment at the corner of Punt rd and Union st, Windsor.

 

ON THIS DAY – July 19, 1947

DESPITE an intensive investigation, no evidence had been found to establish responsibility for the shooting of James Coates, 46, on July 19, Detective W. W. Mooney said yesterday at an inquest into Coates’ death. Coates was found dead on a vacant allotment at the corner of Punt rd and Union st, Prahran. There were three bullet wounds in his abdomen and one in his neck. Mr H. B. Wade, PM, city coroner, found that Coates had died from the effects of revolver shots feloniously inflicted by a person or persons unknown.

ANONYMOUS PHONE CALLS

Chief witness at the inquest was Coates’ widow, Mrs Edith Coates, of Walsh st, South Yarra. She covered her face with a long black veil before entering and leaving the courtroom.Mrs Coates said her husband helped to wipe the dinner dishes on the night of July 19, and then left the flat saying he was going to buy a newspaper. When he did not return she thought he had gone to play cards. She believed he intended to walk and had not known he had been using a motorcar. About two weeks before her husband’s death several anonymous telephone calls had been made to their flat. On each occasion a male voice asked for “Constable Coates.” She did not remember the caller using the words “the police pimp.” On several occasions the caller said she should poison her husband, and that he was going to be shot. Her husband did not tell the police of these threats, nor did he tell her he knew the identity of the caller. Bonnie Joy Bricknell, of Glenhuntly rd, Elsternwick, said she had known Coates for several years. She owned a small sedan car which was found near the allotment where Coates’ body was found. She had frequently lent the car to Coates and lent it to him on July 18, when he said he wanted it for a few days. Louise Lambert, of Murphy st, South Yarra, said she was a shop assistant in a newsagency in Toorak rd. Coates, who was a customer, bought two newspapers in the shop about 7.40pm on July 19. Another man who was in the shop when Coates entered patted Coates on the back and said, “How are you?” They seemed friendly, and left the shop together.

HEARD FOUR SHOTS FIRED

Joan Holding, of Union st, Windsor, said she left home about 9pm on July 19 to exercise her dog. She turned into Punt rd when she heard a shot, which was followed by three more shots. She saw a man jump over the fence at the western end of the corner allotment. The man was wearing a long overcoat. He went into Union st. She then saw two constables run towards the allotment. First-constable Charles White said he was on duty in the police station near the allotment when he heard the shots. He approached two girls waiting at a bus stop and asked if they had heard revolver shots. They said: No, it is only some boys letting off crackers in the paddock.Witness did not see any person leave the allotment, but saw a man leave a lane off Union st and walk toward St Kilda rd.

On This Day……… 7th April 1845

On this day in 1845 two men named, Mad Arthur and Kurrajong Sawyer, rolled down a hill in Windsor, New South Wales, from Freeman’s Australian Hotel to Blanchard’s Hotel for a small wager. They got off to a start, but Kurrajong Sawyer was the clear winner, beating Mad Arthur by nine minutes.

 

 

ON THIS DAY – 12th December 1930

Dr. Arthur Bretherton, at the Coroner’s Court on this day 1930, was committed for trial on a charge of murdering Vera Wakeling, aged 23, milliner, of Windsor. The coroner found death was due to blood poisoning following illegal interference. Ball was fixed at 1600 pounds, with a surety of a like amount. Giving evidence two doctors of the Women’s Hospital said when Wakeling was admitted she told them Dr. Bretherton had operated on her for £10. They operated on her, but she died the next day. In the depositions the woman gave her name as Mrs. Vera Harrison and in her dying depositions stated her previous statement in relation to an illegal operation was correct.

 

ON THIS DAY…… 16th September 1881

Mr. Candler held an inquest at the Melbourne Morgue on the body of a newly born female child, which was found in a paddock at the Avenue, High Street, Windsor, at halt past 5 o’clock on this day in 1881. The body was wrapped in a piece of coarse canvas, and tied up tightly with some twine Dr. Neild made a post-mortem examination of the body, which was matured, well developed, and larger than the average. The child was born alive, and the cause of death was suffocation. The jury returned a verdict that the deceased was wilfully suffocated, and that some person or persons unknown were guilty of wilful murder.

 

 

On this day …….. 11th September 1863

Bushranger Captain Thunderbolt was born Frederick Ward at Wilberforce near Windsor, NSW, in 1836. As an excellent horseman, his specialty was horse stealing. For this, he was sentenced in 1856 to ten years on Cockatoo Island in Sydney Harbour. On 1 July 1860, Ward was released on a ticket-of-leave to work on a farm at Mudgee. While he was on ticket-of-leave, he returned to horse-stealing, and was again sentenced to Cockatoo Island. Conditions in the gaol were harsh, and he endured solitary confinement a number of times. On the night of 11 September 1863, he and another inmate escaped from the supposedly escape-proof prison by swimming to the mainland. After his escape, Ward embarked on a life of bushranging, under the name of Captain Thunderbolt. Much of his bushranging was done around the small NSW country town of Uralla. A rock originally known as “Split Rock” became known as “Thunderbolt’s Rock”. After a six-year reign as a “gentleman bushranger”, Thunderbolt was shot dead by Constable Alexander Walker in May 1870.

 

On This Day – August 28, 1933

A GRAPHIC story of events associated with the fatal shooting of Betty Martin, 33, of Wrexham Road, Windsor; the wounding of her husband, Henry Martin, traveller; and the suicide of Isaac John Cohen Jedwab, 57, manufacturer. of Glen Eira Road, Caulfield, was told at the inquest at the Morgue on October 3. Jedwab turned the revolver on himself after he had shot the others in the kitchen of their home on the morning of August 28.

The Coroner (Mr D. Grant, P.M.) found that Betty Martin had been murdered by Jedwab, who then committed suicide. Harry Hirsch, cutter and designer, of Fenwick Street, North Carlton, said that he had been employed by Jedwab during the past six months. The business had been failing and Jedwab had not been attending to it properly. “Jedwab had been betting on race-horses’ said Hirsch, ‘About three months ago. after a meeting of creditors at the factory, Jedwab said to me; If Martin goes again me, or into partnership with anybody else, I’ll shoot him. “Later he came to my table in the workshop and said, ‘Martin is against me, ruins me.  He told me to watch Martin, as he was thieving.”

Hella Jedwab, widow, said that about 6.30 a.m. on August 28, her husband got up, and after having had a cup of tea, he took her one. He told her that he was up early because he wanted “to go in early.” Before he left the premises he went to the bedroom window and said he would not take the car. It was usual for him to go into the city by car. He said he would be home early. He had been very worried of late and had been losing money. “He had often told me,” continued Mrs Jedwab, “that the Martins— Henry Martin and Betty Martin, the former ot whom was employed by, and had an interest in, my husband’s business— had been robbing him. “He said several times that he would kill Martin. About two years ago he took out his revolver to shoot Martin and I caused the gun to be taken away from him.”

Lawrence Reginald Hill, carpenter, of Candy Street, Westgarth, who was working on a new building near the Martins’ home on August 28, said that he could overlook the yard and kitchen of the Martins’ place. About 8.40 a.m. he heard a gunshot and a woman screamed. Two more shots followed in quick succession. He got off the scaffolding and with Jack Jones, who was working with him, ran around into Wrexham Road. When opposite the Martins’ home he saw Martin staggering down the path at the side of the house. Martin, who had his hands to his face and was bleeding freely, said: “Please help me; there has been an explosion. Get a doctor and see if my wife is all right. My uncle is in there, too. I was taking medicine and there was an explosion.”

With his face heavily bandaged, Henry Martin, husband of the dead woman, was helped into the Court. He said that he was a director of the London and Parisian Pleaters, of Brien Lane, City. Jedwab was the proprietor. On August 28 Jedwab arrived at the house about 8 a.m. It had been usual during the fortnight before the shooting for Jedwab to call and for them to go to the city together. “After he arrived,” said Martin, “I repaired a puncture in the tyre of one of the wheels of my car. Jedwab assisted me and we discussed only the job we were doing. He was quite friendly. “Then we went into the kitchen, and my wife gave him and me a cup of tea. She then poured me out a dose of medicine. “I was standing near the sink arid had raised the glass to drink it when I heard an explosion near my head.” “I seemed to go blind, and I staggered out of the kitchen. I heard another explosion just before I left, and a scream.”  Martin said that he did not know Jedwab had a gun with him that morning, although he did know that he often carried one. About three or four weeks before the tragedy witness had been warned by Hirsch that Jedwab had made a threat to shoot him (Martin). Continuing Martin said that he had been employed by Jedwab for seven years, and for the past four years had been a director of the firm. He had had several differences with Jedwab as to his manner of running the business. They were not serious differences, however.”I know the business was in a bad way,” said Martin, “the reason being that Jedwab had, during the last 12 months, withdrawn hundreds of pounds from the business to bet on horses. I used to sign cheques in blank as I was out most of the day getting orders. “I spoke to him about it and he resented it. He never accused me of robbing him. “About three weeks before the affair I was fed up with Jedwab and told him I would leave. He begged me not to go. “In June last, Mr Hirsch and I entered into an agreement that if one of us left Jedwab, the other would leave also, and we were to start in business together. Two or three days before the shooting I had an idea that Jedwab knew something about the agreement.” Martin added that he did not think that Jedwab had any quarrel with Mrs Martin. She was Jedwab’s niece. In 1925 or 1926. while in London, Jedwab had taken poison after matrimonial troubles.

A finding of murder and suicide, was recorded.

ON THIS DAY – July 26, 1933

 

At the inquest into the death of Katherine Dorman, 24, machinist, on July 26, following an attack and injuries inflicted with an iron pipe while in her bedroom at Windsor the Coroner found John Boles murdered her and ordered a warrant for his arrest after hearing the evidence of Miss Dorman’s land-lady, Mrs. Nellie Burke, that Boles had repeatedly hit Dorman over the head with the pipe. Boles, who is a married man left a letter saying that he had lost his employment, which meant his means for getting a divorce had gone. This seemed to unhinge his overstrung nerves and then he simply wanted to die and take the dear girl with him.

ON THIS DAY – July 19, 1947

DESPITE an intensive investigation, no evidence had been found to establish responsibility for the shooting of James Coates, 46, on July 19, Detective W. W. Mooney said yesterday at an inquest into Coates’ death. Coates was found dead on a vacant allotment at the corner of Punt rd and Union st, Prahran. There were three bullet wounds in his abdomen and one in his neck. Mr H. B. Wade, PM, city coroner, found that Coates had died from the effects of revolver shots feloniously inflicted by a person or persons unknown.

ANONYMOUS PHONE CALLS

Chief witness at the inquest was Coates’ widow, Mrs Edith Coates, of Walsh st, South Yarra. She covered her face with a long black veil before entering and leaving the courtroom.Mrs Coates said her husband helped to wipe the dinner dishes on the night of July 19, and then left the flat saying he was going to buy a newspaper. When he did not return she thought he had gone to play cards. She believed he intended to walk and had not known he had been using a motorcar. About two weeks before her husband’s death several anonymous telephone calls had been made to their flat. On each occasion a male voice asked for “Constable Coates.” She did not remember the caller using the words “the police pimp.” On several occasions the caller said she should poison her husband, and that he was going to be shot. Her husband did not tell the police of these threats, nor did he tell her he knew the identity of the caller. Bonnie Joy Bricknell, of Glenhuntly rd, Elsternwick, said she had known Coates for several years. She owned a small sedan car which was found near the allotment where Coates’ body was found. She had frequently lent the car to Coates and lent it to him on July 18, when he said he wanted it for a few days. Louise Lambert, of Murphy st, South Yarra, said she was a shop assistant in a newsagency in Toorak rd. Coates, who was a customer, bought two newspapers in the shop about 7.40pm on July 19. Another man who was in the shop when Coates entered patted Coates on the back and said, “How are you?” They seemed friendly, and left the shop together.

HEARD FOUR SHOTS FIRED

Joan Holding, of Union st, Windsor, said she left home about 9pm on July 19 to exercise her dog. She turned into Punt rd when she heard a shot, which was followed by three more shots. She saw a man jump over the fence at the western end of the corner allotment. The man was wearing a long overcoat. He went into Union st. She then saw two constables run towards the allotment. First-constable Charles White said he was on duty in the police station near the allotment when he heard the shots. He approached two girls waiting at a bus stop and asked if they had heard revolver shots. They said: No, it is only some boys letting off crackers in the paddock.Witness did not see any person leave the allotment, but saw a man leave a lane off Union st and walk toward St Kilda rd.

ON THIS DAY – July 19, 1947

Melbourne Gangster James Coates who scammed £40,000 from an Australian grazier, £19,000 from an Austrian nobleman, £15,000 from the son of the Sweden’s King, and from an Indian prince, he stole £80,000 was murdered.

The weeks before Coates murder he had received anonymous phone calls, first calling him Constable Coates, second an ambulance was called to his apartment saying a man had been shoot and third a hearse had been called to collect Coates body.

Coates body was found in a vacant allotment at the corner of Punt rd and Union st, Windsor.