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On this day …….. 12th of December 1908

On the evening of the 12th of December 1908, Mr. Phillip Wirths of Wirths’ Circus, met with a painful accident. He was riding his favourite horse Bobs round the ring, and jumping through burning hoops held by the attendants. The rim of which struck him on the forehead, and threw him back on his horse, before he fell to the ground. Mr. Wirths, although severely burned about the face, courageously completed his performance.

 

On This Day ……. 29th October 1954

Escaped Elephant – Richmond

An escaped elephant from Wirth’s Circus’ temporary camp outside Olympic Park in Richmond, Melbourne caused a mild panic on the 29th October 1954. At 9.30 p.m. a check was made by the boys guarding the elephants, and it was found that one was missing. Telephone calls started to pour into Russell St. police station from people on their way home from the city saying that they had seen an elephant walking along Batman Ave. A police car was rushed to the scene and after a two and a half hour search they found the missing elephant. It was standing under a tree about 200 yards away from the camp.

On this day …….. 22nd of July 1891

On this day in 1891, a bizarre scene on the streets of Sydney wandering in the streets of Kings Cross, looking quite out of place, even in an area noted for its variety of human eccentricity, were two North American Red Indian Chiefs, apparently lost, unable to find their way back to their teepee, which was located at some distance, where the Wirth’s Circus was playing. The two men, American Bear and Eagle Elk, had been brought to Australia by the circus. Their presence in Kings Cross was alarming the locals, and the pale faces were attacking the Indians. Friendless, a fellow North American came to rescue them from their attackers. In a charming twist of history, their rescuer turned out to be a retiredUS Cavalry Captain on holidays in Sydney.

 

On this day …….. 23rd May 1930

When part of the seating in Wirth’s Circus collapsed during a performance at West Maitland, New South Wales, on this day in 1930, a woman threw her baby forward over the heads of five rows of people, as she fell. It was caught unharmed by a man in the audience. Some 700 people sank to the ground in a heap when seating collapsed, but there was no panic. Although many suffered from bruising and minor cuts, only one woman needed medical attention.

On this day …….. 21st of April 1934

Chance has played many curious tricks, but never before one such as was played at about 10 o’clock last night, with Madame Prince and her monkey Tarzan the principals in an amazing episode at Wirth’s Circus. Towards the end of their act Tarzan, the monkey shoots, from a distance of 15 feet at a balloon attached to a steel target. Last night the animal’s mistress arranged the pea-rifle, which was loaded with a .22 short cartridge, and the patrons waited expectantly for the report. It came, but according to the police, the bullet completely missed the target and bored its way through a one-Inch plank, then through the canvas tent, to lodge in the back of Charles Alfred Broomhall, 23, of Albion-street, Sydney, an employee of Wirth’s Circus. Luckily, the velocity of the flying pellet had considerably decreased when it struck Broomhall, and the only in jury sustained was a flesh wound. Broomhall was treated at St. Vincent’s Hospital and allowed to leave. He was X-rayed, for the purpose of locating the pellet.

 

On loan from Wirth’s Circus, Australia’s largest and most prestigious circus company, the Robur elephant toured Sydney tea rooms in March 1939. As ridiculous as it might seem nowadays, the elephant made a special guest appearance at 695 George Street, a stone’s throw from Central Station and one of Sydney’s busiest precincts. The elephant also dropped by a Bussell Brothers grocer on Anzac Parade in Maroubra in the city’s east. And when an elephant came to visit, there was clearly no shortage of novelty-sized tea cups and charmed onlookers.

On this day …….. 13th of January 1914

A horse valued at £25, belonging to the Messrs Young Bros., produce merchants, on this day in 1914, dropped dead in Eastwood-street, Ballarat from fright, consequent on seeing an elephant belonging to Wirths’ circus. The elephant was at the time drawing a wagon, the horse trembled violently. As the elephant approached the horse dropped dead.

 

On this day …….. 16th of December 1907

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A sensational railway accident occurred at Dimboola on this night in 1907, resulting in the death of a valuable circus pony. The animals belonging to Wirth’s circus were being trucked when the points refused to act. This caused one of the truck to be thrown on to its side. The trick pony Fairy was thrown upon the metals, and had her neck broken. The animal was valued at £1,000. The truck was badly damaged. The elephants belonging to the circus lifted the truck back onto the line.

 

On this day …….. 15th of December 1905

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During a performance of Wirth’s Circus at Warrnambool, on this day in 1905, a tent-pole fell and struck Doris Dunstan aged 14, the only daughter of Rev. T. D. Dunstan, Anglican clergyman. The girl was pinned to the ground as the big top partially collapsed. The girl died a couple of hours later.

12380539_221580294839773_1829296182_nOn this day …….. 12th of December 1908

On the evening of the 12th of December 1908, Mr. Phillip Wirths of Wirths’ Circus, met with a painful accident. He was riding his favourite horse Bobs round the ring, and jumping through burning hoops held by the attendants. The rim of which struck him on the forehead, and threw him back on his horse, before he fell to the ground. Mr. Wirths, although severely burned about the face, courageously completed his performance.

 

Port Melbourne

12336182_221242388206897_1039274468_nAroused by a neighbour, who was on his way to work at an early, hour one day on the 22nd of November 1921, Mr. M. Rabinov, a pawnbroker of Bay street, Port Melbourne, found that his back garden had been completely wrecked. There was a large gap in a wooden fence which separates the garden from a vacant allotment and there was not one tree left standing in the garden. A large pepper tree aged 40 years, was uprooted, as well as an apricot and peach trees were strewn, about the lawn. Surveying, the ruin and swinging his trunk to and fro was a huge elephant, which refused, to move. Later the elephant’s trainer arrived, and explained that the animal was Cardi, an Indian male, the largest in Wirth’s circus at the Olympia, With three other elephants Cardi broke his chains early in the morning. Three of the elephants had not left Wirth’s Park. Search parties had been looking for Cardi for some time. The elephant left quietly with his trainer.

Richmond

12325132_221240768207059_1179965847_nAn escaped elephant from Wirth’s Circus’ temporary camp outside Olympic Park in Richmond caused a mild panic on the 29th October 1954. At 9.30 p.m. a check was made by the boys guarding the elephants, and it was found that one was missing. Then telephone calls started to pour into Russell St. police station from people on their way home from the city saying that they had seen an elephant walking along Batman Ave. A police car was rushed to the scene and after a two and a half hour search they found the missing elephant. It was standing under a tree about 200yds away from the camp.