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ON THIS DAY ……. 8th April 1931

PORT MELBOURNE

MAN ON MURDER CHARGE.

The mystery of a woman’s body, found in a cupboard at Thomas Garrity’s fish shop, in Bay-street, Port Melbourne, on this day in 1931, was related to the jury and Mr. Justice MaeFarlane, in the Criminal Court, when Garrity was charged with having murdered. Mrs. Rose Harvey, 51. The Crown Prosecutor said Mrs. Harvey died from severe head injuries, inflicted by a hard instrument or a kick. On the day before the murder, she had several drinks with Garrity in a city hotel, and later they went to Garrity’s shop. At midnight a man heard the voices of a man and woman in the shop, and half an hour later a constable was passing the shop when he saw shadows on the glass partition. The shadow were of a man and woman struggling. The man had hold of the woman’s throat, and he saw her tear the man’s hands away. Some hours later Garrity asked taxi-driver to dispose of a body for him. He said he had found the body dumped on his premises after two men and a woman had left his shop. The taxi-driver took Garrity to the police station, and Garrity told the police. that lie was drugged by people, who were in his shop, and found the body when he woke up. The Crown Prosecutor said the evidence pointed to Garrity striking Mrs. Harvey dragging her body upstairs, bringing it down again, placing it the washhouse, and then in the cupboard. Cross-examined. Dr. Hart, who, was called by the police to examine the body before it was moved from the cupboard, said it would have been very difficult for one man to have placed the body in the position in which it was found. The hearing was adjourned.

 

On This Day ……. 6th May 1901

A remarkable incident came to light in connection with the arrest of a woman ,that was found lying intoxicated, in Mercer street. She complained of sciatica, and remained in the lock-up all night. At the police court on the following morning she still” persisted, that her inability to walk was due to sciatica, but on removal to the gaol hospital she was found to be suffering from a fractured thigh.

 

ON THIS DAY – May 4, 1907

RICHMOND

William Grace (20) on Saturday night week rushed to protect a woman, who screamed that a man was assaulting her. Grace struck the woman’s assailant, Arthur Hayes (20), killing him. Grace was yesterday committed for trial by the coroner on a charge of wilful murder. The evidence at the inquest did not bring out any additional details of importance. Two witnesses said that Grace was drunk at the time. It appeared he knew the woman assailed, Mrs. Norah Inell (living apart from her husband) well enough to address her by her Christian name. He also knew Hayes, but did not recognise him at the time he struck him. He heard Inell call for assistance, and he hit the man on the eye, the blow, according to the post-mortem, causing extravasation of blood on the surface of the brain. The coroner said that even if Grace’s own account were accepted, he was guilty of manslaughter, and the jury might consider him guilty of murder.

ON THIS DAY ……. 8th April 1931

PORT MELBOURNE

MAN ON MURDER CHARGE.

The mystery of a woman’s body, found in a cupboard at Thomas Garrity’s fish shop, in Bay-street, Port Melbourne, on this day in 1931, was related to the jury and Mr. Justice MaeFarlane, in the Criminal Court, when Garrity was charged with having murdered. Mrs. Rose Harvey, 51. The Crown Prosecutor said Mrs. Harvey died from severe head injuries, inflicted by a hard instrument or a kick. On the day before the murder, she had several drinks with Garrity in a city hotel, and later they went to Garrity’s shop. At midnight a man heard the voices of a man and woman in the shop, and half an hour later a constable was passing the shop when he saw shadows on the glass partition. The shadow were of a man and woman struggling. The man had hold of the woman’s throat, and he saw her tear the man’s hands away. Some hours later Garrity asked taxi-driver to dispose of a body for him. He said he had found the body dumped on his premises after two men and a woman had left his shop. The taxi-driver took Garrity to the police station, and Garrity told the police. that lie was drugged by people, who were in his shop, and found the body when he woke up. The Crown Prosecutor said the evidence pointed to Garrity striking Mrs. Harvey dragging her body upstairs, bringing it down again, placing it the washhouse, and then in the cupboard. Cross-examined. Dr. Hart, who, was called by the police to examine the body before it was moved from the cupboard, said it would have been very difficult for one man to have placed the body in the position in which it was found. The hearing was adjourned.

 

On This Day ……. 1st April 1854

On the 1st April 1854, Catherine Smith, female turnkey of the Geelong gaol, described a lunatic prison Ann Connelly. The Prisoner was rather violent and was very dirty in her habits, and required attendance as a child. She has been obliged to keep her bed from dysentery, and had to keep one of the female prisoners constantly in attendance upon her. She has been well and carefully treated, the doctor seeing her constantly. She has been confined to her cell for the last fortnight. Her cell was very offensive, notwithstanding all our efforts to keep it otherwise. Staff had to separate her in consequence, and place her in a private cell, which is very small, and exposed to the noise arising from a woman, who is constantly making an uproar.

 

On This Day – 8th March 1907

Four prisoners, of the usual vagrant and feeble class, were received at the Geelong gaol on this day in 1907 from Pentridge, and the police escort took back two female prisoners to Coburg. Since the Penal authorities transferred the matron from the gaol, it has been necessary to engage an outside woman to attend to female prisoners until it is convenient to transfer them to Melbourne.

 

 

On This Day – 1st March 1854

On the 1st March 1854, Catherine Smith, female turnkey of the Geelong gaol, described a lunatic prison Ann Connelly. The Prisoner was rather violent and was very dirty in her habits, and required attendance as a child. She has been obliged to keep her bed from dysentery, and had to keep one of the female prisoners constantly in attendance upon her. She has been well and carefully treated, the doctor seeing her constantly. She has been confined to her cell for the last fortnight. Her cell was very offensive, notwithstanding all our efforts to keep it otherwise. Staff had to separate her in consequence, and place her in a private cell, which is very small, and exposed to the noise arising from a woman, who is constantly making an uproar.

 

 

On this day …….. 6th of January 1791

Australia, the land of Shark attacks. There hasn’t been many summers since records were started that there hasn’t been a fatal shark attacks some where in Australia. The first recorded shark attack happened to an aboriginal woman in Port Jackson, Sydney in 1791. She was bitten in half.

 

On This Day ……. 6th May 1901

A remarkable incident came to light in connection with the arrest of a woman ,that was found lying intoxicated, in Mercer street. She complained of sciatica, and remained in the lock-up all night. At the police court on the following morning she still” persisted, that her inability to walk was due to sciatica, but on removal to the gaol hospital she was found to be suffering from a fractured thigh.

 

ON THIS DAY – May 4, 1907

RICHMOND

William Grace (20) on Saturday night week rushed to protect a woman, who screamed that a man was assaulting her. Grace struck the woman’s assailant, Arthur Hayes (20), killing him. Grace was yesterday committed for trial by the coroner on a charge of wilful murder. The evidence at the inquest did not bring out any additional details of importance. Two witnesses said that Grace was drunk at the time. It appeared he knew the woman assailed, Mrs. Norah Inell (living apart from her husband) well enough to address her by her Christian name. He also knew Hayes, but did not recognise him at the time he struck him. He heard Inell call for assistance, and he hit the man on the eye, the blow, according to the post-mortem, causing extravasation of blood on the surface of the brain. The coroner said that even if Grace’s own account were accepted, he was guilty of manslaughter, and the jury might consider him guilty of murder.

ON THIS DAY ……. 8th April 1931

PORT MELBOURNE

MAN ON MURDER CHARGE.

The mystery of a woman’s body, found in a cupboard at Thomas Garrity’s fish shop, in Bay-street, Port Melbourne, on this day in 1931, was related to the jury and Mr. Justice MaeFarlane, in the Criminal Court, when Garrity was charged with having murdered. Mrs. Rose Harvey, 51. The Crown Prosecutor said Mrs. Harvey died from severe head injuries, inflicted by a hard instrument or a kick. On the day before the murder, she had several drinks with Garrity in a city hotel, and later they went to Garrity’s shop. At midnight a man heard the voices of a man and woman in the shop, and half an hour later a constable was passing the shop when he saw shadows on the glass partition. The shadow were of a man and woman struggling. The man had hold of the woman’s throat, and he saw her tear the man’s hands away. Some hours later Garrity asked taxi-driver to dispose of a body for him. He said he had found the body dumped on his premises after two men and a woman had left his shop. The taxi-driver took Garrity to the police station, and Garrity told the police. that lie was drugged by people, who were in his shop, and found the body when he woke up. The Crown Prosecutor said the evidence pointed to Garrity striking Mrs. Harvey dragging her body upstairs, bringing it down again, placing it the washhouse, and then in the cupboard. Cross-examined. Dr. Hart, who, was called by the police to examine the body before it was moved from the cupboard, said it would have been very difficult for one man to have placed the body in the position in which it was found. The hearing was adjourned.

 

On This Day ……. 1st April 1854

On the 1st April 1854, Catherine Smith, female turnkey of the Geelong gaol, described a lunatic prison Ann Connelly. The Prisoner was rather violent and was very dirty in her habits, and required attendance as a child. She has been obliged to keep her bed from dysentery, and had to keep one of the female prisoners constantly in attendance upon her. She has been well and carefully treated, the doctor seeing her constantly. She has been confined to her cell for the last fortnight. Her cell was very offensive, notwithstanding all our efforts to keep it otherwise. Staff had to separate her in consequence, and place her in a private cell, which is very small, and exposed to the noise arising from a woman, who is constantly making an uproar.